Lilly Endowment Awards $2.2 Million to Historically Black Colleges

By Neverdon-Morton, Cynthia | Negro History Bulletin, April-June 1997 | Go to article overview

Lilly Endowment Awards $2.2 Million to Historically Black Colleges


Neverdon-Morton, Cynthia, Negro History Bulletin


Eleven independent historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs) were awarded $2.2 million from Indianapolis-based Lilly Endowment Inc. in its Strengthening Institutions Program.

Forty-six schools were invited to participate in the competition which was announced last fall. The Endowment's Board of Directors approved the awards at their March meeting.

The schools will use the funds to address issues on their campuses that they feel will most effectively enable them to take advantage of their strengths and minimize their shortcomings. The colleges will carry out projects to increase enrollment and retention, improve fund-raising capabilities, restructure curriculums, train faculty to use technology effectively and expand library resources.

"Private HBCUs are more successful than any other type of postsecondary institution in graduating black students. They also send a higher proportion of their students on to graduate and professional schools," said Ralph E. Lundgren, Endowment vice president for education. Lundgren continued, "All colleges and universities continually must assess and evaluate the effectiveness of their curriculum, faculty development programs and enrollment strategies in ongoing efforts to deliver an affordable, quality education. We think these grants can help these private HBCUs remain viable institutions of higher learning."

The eleven schools receiving grants are:

Bennett College, Greensboro, NC, S190,841 to adopt a more personal approach in establishing an enrollment and retention project to increase its graduation rate;

Clark Atlanta University, Atlanta, GA, $200,000 to improve its development and university relations activities to increase private and public sector grants in anticipation of a fund-raising campaign;

Florida Memorial College, Miami, FL, $199,997 to improve student academic performance in remedial and core courses by engaging faculty in learning workshops and effective teaching strategies;

Hampton University, Hampton, VA, $200,000 to initiate a faculty development program that integrates the teaching and scholarship roles of faculty;

Howard University, Washington, DC., $199,990 to restructure and revamp the undergraduate engineering curriculum;

Morris College, Sumter, SC, $200,000 to improve its graduation rate by strengthening and coordinating upper-division advising and retention efforts;

Oakwood College, Huntsville, AL, $200,000 to offer a series of workshops to train all faculty and staff to become effective users of technology;

Philander Smith College, Little Rock, AR, $200,000 to establish a faculty development program that includes a systematic faculty evaluation program;

Tougaloo College, Tougaloo, MS, $200,000 to initiate a faculty development program to integrate computer applications into courses and scholarship;

Virginia Union University, Richmond, VA, $200,00 to encourage faculty, staff, students and the community to use its new library and resource center;

Voorhees College, Denmark, SC, $200,000 to integrate its state- of- the art technology into classroom instruction in all academic divisions.

The Endowment's Board of Directors also approved a $2.4 million fund for up to 12 grants at a maximum of $200,000 each in the 1998 Strengthening Institutions Program for Independent HBCUs.

Under the theme "The South: A Continuing Struggle," North Carolina Central University saluted John Hope Franklin January 16-17, 1997. The program, dedicated tanin's wife Aurelia W. Franklin, included keynote addresses by Dr. Horace G. Dawson, Jr., director of the Patricia Roberts Harris public affairs program, Howard University, Washington, DC., on "The Challenge of Foreign Service and International Affairs: Impact on the Black Community and Youth" and Dr. Trudier Harris, the J. Carlyle Sitterson Professor of English at the University of North Carolina (Chapel Hill), on "The Struggle Continues: Denying that We Are Culturally Kin. …

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