Trends in State Juvenile Justice Legislation - 1996

By Lyons, Donna; Turpin, James | Corrections Today, June 1997 | Go to article overview

Trends in State Juvenile Justice Legislation - 1996


Lyons, Donna, Turpin, James, Corrections Today


Juvenile justice legislation was a hot topic during 1996. Among the highlights were changes in the following areas:

* improving dispositional planning for young offenders;

* expanding options available to courts;

* prescribing policy for use of juvenile detention and corrections;

* holding parents responsible for their children's crimes;

* creating extended or special jurisdiction systems or circumstances for juveniles;

* distinguishing young offenders who may face criminal charges; and

* designing and funding juvenile crime prevention.

At least four states (Kansas, Kentucky, Utah and Virginia) passed broad reforms of their entire juvenile justice processes. This type of legislative activism is likely to continue in 1997, as the issue of juvenile justice achieves even higher national prominence.

The purpose of this article is not to identify all juvenile justice legislation passed in 1996, but instead to identify trends.

Juvenile Court Created

The Utah Juvenile Court Act of 1996 created and established rules, practices and procedures for a state juvenile court. It has jurisdiction for offenders up to age 21 who violated the law before the age of 18. In addition, the state established an interagency Juvenile Justice Task Force to study, among other things, how to balance rehabilitation and accountability in juvenile justice.

Legislation passed in Virginia had the stated purpose of providing for community safety, protection of victims' rights and accountability of juvenile offenders for their behavior. It lowers the age for certain "violent juvenile felonies" to 14. The new law also details which juveniles will be waived to adult court. The Department of Corrections is required to establish facilities within the adult prison system for juveniles sentenced as adults.

Restitution And Community Service

Virginia's law also requires assessments which may demand restitution and community service. Boot camps are suggested as diversion options, including those run by private contractors. In some cases, parents are held accountable. The act also expands the adult treatment of juvenile offenders charged with violent felonies. Fiscal impact and one-year appropriations are required for measures which result in net increases in commitment to juvenile facilities. The projected price tag for the fast year is set at $5.4 million.

Other State Reorganizations

New York began a major reform process which is likely to be expanded in 1997. This probably will result in mandatory extended sentences for serious offenders, as well as increased attention to victims' interests and the use of juvenile records.

Alaska expanded its definition concerning what constitutes juvenile crime and delinquency as well as increased enforcement of curfews and truancy violations. Nebraska reorganized and streamlined its juvenile services by consolidating a number of programs and offices. Indiana is studying how to reorganize its program in 1997 on an interagency basis. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Trends in State Juvenile Justice Legislation - 1996
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.