Women's History Month: HBCU Women Light Up Stage and Screen

By Stewart, Pearl | Diverse Issues in Higher Education, March 19, 2009 | Go to article overview

Women's History Month: HBCU Women Light Up Stage and Screen


Stewart, Pearl, Diverse Issues in Higher Education


[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

When Taraji Henson was nominated for an Academy Award this year for best supporting actress, he celebration rippled beyond Hollywood and into the halls of two historically Black universities. Henson attended North Carolina A&T State University and graduated from Howard University as a theater major in 1995.

Henson, who was nominated for the Oscar for her role in 'The Curious Case of Benjamin Button" but did not win, is one of dozens of female graduates from HBCUs whose names are illuminating marquees all over the country. In films, on W, on Broadway and in community theaters, these grads are not only demonstrating their own talent, but they are promoting the performing arts programs of their respective institutions.

"I've never seen anybody who could occupy their space the way Taraji could. You knew this girl was going somewhere; says Mark Jolin, a professor of acting in Howard's School of Fine Arts.

Success on stage and screen is not new for Howard grads. Among the best known are sisters Debbie Allen and Phylicia Rashad. Rashad won a Tony for Best Leading Actress in a Play for "A Raisin in the Sun" in 2004, and the multitalented Allen won two Emmys for the hit IV show "Fame."

At Florida A&M University, director of theatre Dr. Valencia Matthews shared in the excitement when former student Anika Noni Rose won a Tony Award for her 2004 performance in "Caroline, or Change:' Rose has since jetted to stardom, co-starring in the movie "Dreamgirls," and she is currently in HBO's 'The No. 1 Ladies' Detective Agency."

Matthews visited with Rose after seeing her on Broadway in "Cat on a Hot Tin Roof" last year with Terrence Howard and Phylicia Rashad. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • A full archive of books and articles related to this one
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Women's History Month: HBCU Women Light Up Stage and Screen
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.