A Great Gallery Reinvented; EXHIBITION

The Evening Standard (London, England), April 3, 2009 | Go to article overview

A Great Gallery Reinvented; EXHIBITION


Byline: BEN LEWIS

REOPENING SHOWS Whitechapel Gallery, E1 .. .. .. .. ...

NOWADAYS, you have to spend a trillion to impress me, so the Whitechapel's [pounds sterling]13.5 million renovation feels like rather small beer.

The century-old gallery has taken over the library next door and doubled in size, but it's not the increase in space that stands out -- at the end of the day, it's just a few more whitewashed rooms and a big lift, and I've seen a glut of them in the past six months with the Saatchi Gallery reopening and Alex Sainsbury's Raven Row.

What makes the new Whitechapel interesting is the art it is showing and the concept behind the gallery's expansion. Downstairs there is a large installation by the Londonbased Polish artist Goshka Macuga, who was nominated for the Turner Prize last year.

Macuga is one the leading proponents of the new genre of exhibition-as-artwork.

Here she pulls together a tapestry of Picasso's Guernica, some films of the Spanish Civil War and her own sculpture of Colin Powell holding up a vial of Anthrax at his famous speech to the UN in 2003.

There are some highly desirable Afghan war rugs -- carpets decorated with tanks and Kalashnikovs (I want one!) -- and a circular table in the centre, in the style of the UN meeting room. This also doubles as a set of vitrines, in which you can see photos and graphics from the Spanish Civil War and the UN's deliberation on Iraq.

It's a good puzzle -- what links these elements? Picasso's original Guernica was shown in the Whitechapel in 1939. The painting commemorated the Nazi's aerial bombardment of the Spanish town during the Spanish Civil War. The Guernica tapestry usually hangs in the UN outside the Security Council room and the Americans ordered it to be covered up while Powell gave that speech attacking Iraq.

This is an elegant and stimulating combination of disparate elements but it is also clever. It was a rare moment in which art suddenly became involved in an inadvertent admission of truth -- a revealing by hiding -- a gesture from the US questioning its future bombing of Iraq.

The Whitechapel's main gallery spaces are filled with a well-selected retrospective of the idiosyncratic Riddley-Walker-esque work of Isa Genzken, Germany's leading female artist, spanning her career since the Eighties. Genzken is more or less a pop artist, with her own sleek and miminalist, witty and feminine, sensuous and vulnerable take on the icons of urban living. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

A Great Gallery Reinvented; EXHIBITION
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.