Editor's Shelf


Our friends at Routledge publications have provided readers with a new series on Strategy and History, edited by two of Parameters' stalwarts, Colin Gray and Williamson Murray. The series focuses on the theory and practice of strategy. It is designed as a review of historical cases that have either impacted or served as examples for the exercise of grand and military strategy. A most valuable contribution to the series is America, Technology and Strategic Culture by Brice F. Harris. This timely addition to the genre of war in the Clausewitzian tradition examines the origins, viability, and technical feasibility of the military strategy currently exercised by America. The author espouses a belief that many of the difficult military situations that America finds itself in around the globe today are a direct result of its inclination to substitute technology for strategy. This rather pricy offering is well worth the reader's investment. Anyone with a sincere interest in America's successful revision of its strategic paradigm will certainly get their money's worth from this excellent work.

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

With the ever-increasing torrent of books crossing my desk I sometimes, admittedly, almost never, overlook a new entry into one of the well-managed piles. Such is the case with the edited work by Derek Reveron and Judith Hicks Stiehm, Inside Defense: Understanding the U.S. Military in the 21st Century. The editors, both with well-established reputations within the military and academic arenas--primarily based on their tenure at the Naval War College and the US Army War College, respectively--have assembled the works of scholars, policymakers, and practitioners to provide comprehensive insight regarding the emerging role for the US military in international relations. This new assertiveness is complemented by a renewed and ever-increasing relationship with domestic institutions within America and with the society at large. It was the editors' realization that the traditional military mantra of "fighting and winning the nation's wars" no longer seemed to fit the actions and missions of the US military that they saw in the media. The wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, along with humanitarian relief operations around the globe, and the civil-military operations within the continental United States, all appeared to dictate new roles and strategies for America's military. Of special interest to readers is that portion of the book examining the Department of Defense's interaction with other US governmental institutions.

Some of America's best military history finds its origin in the Secretary of Defense's Historical Office. Renowned for their work detailing the organizational changes within the Office of the Secretary of Defense and the accompanying evolution of the functions and actions of the Armed Services and the Joint Chiefs of Staff, the office has once again published a superb work. Chief editor Roger R. Trask, along with co-editor John P. Glennon, has provided an invaluable addition to the history of the Office of the Secretary of Defense with The Department of Defense, 1978-2003. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Editor's Shelf
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.