Everyday Well-Being in Connection with Health in Immigrant Families with Children-A Study on the Everyday Life of Families with Russian Background in Finland

By Torronen, Maritta | Forum on Public Policy: A Journal of the Oxford Round Table, Spring 2008 | Go to article overview

Everyday Well-Being in Connection with Health in Immigrant Families with Children-A Study on the Everyday Life of Families with Russian Background in Finland


Torronen, Maritta, Forum on Public Policy: A Journal of the Oxford Round Table


Introduction

This study discusses the everyday well-being and health in families with children with Russian background from the presumption that the everyday well-being is reflective of how families express their satisfaction with their current life situation. The framework is based on the understanding that poverty is reflected in the well-being and has a negative impact on parenthood, home atmosphere, family structure, and the resources available. In the family, well-being is based on intimate human relationships and individual needs, whereas government support is based on citizenship and political decision-making. (Moisio 2005, 6.)

This social work study has a multidisciplinary approach. It has links to preventive family work and service system, but it also pertains to sociological family research - especially the areas of everyday life and family research--and to social political welfare research that connects working life and welfare state research. Life satisfaction research is close to the quality of life research, not in relation to happiness but in relation to satisfaction with the immigrants' current life situation.

The Framework of the Study

Finland was suffering from economic recession in the 1990s. At the end of 1980s the average unemployment rate was only 3 % and people had unrealistic expectations of continuous economic growth. Their dreams were suddenly killed and the unemployment rate went up to almost 20 % in a few years. Many companies went bankrupt. Until then Finland had been a homogenous society leaning on the principles of equality of citizens. Like other Nordic countries, Finland has been called a welfare state that provides all Finnish citizens with a health insurance. The Finnish insurance system also guarantees subsistence after having children. Maternity or parental allowance give parents the possibility to take care of the child at home for one year. Finland places a strong emphasis on ensuring equal services for all people. So there have been difficulties to understand differences and give the right to different services (Anis 2007, 31).

Although the preconditions for Finnish well-being have improved even further since the early days of the welfare state, the first decade of the 21st century saw the diversification and polarisation of population. It is connected to the backlash of recession and also to the new liberal thinking of constructing Finnish society. Earlier left-wing parties had more power in Finnish politics, but now there are more right-wing parties in leading positions in the government. To use a dramatic metaphor, polarisation divides people into poor and rich, into those who are well off and those who are badly off. However, most Finnish people belong to the middle class. A new development in Finland is that there is an increasing number of people who are getting very rich and another group that is getting very poor. In other countries there are already sad examples of this kind of development (see Scarr 1994, 90) which is not completely new in Finnish history. At the end of 1980s, the question of social classes was rarely discussed, but now it has been brought up again. The divide between social classes is more sophisticated than in the earlier days, taking into account such aspects as a person's life style in addition to their position in working life and finances.

At the same time with the increasing polarisation, Finland's economic situation is globally seen as being very strong. Therefore it is confusing to see how poor and sick people are queuing up for free food from such charities as the Salvation Army. That this should happened in Helsinki, the capital of Finland, is very disquieting. One reason for this is unemployment and the other is the low level of different allowances. The third reason is that food is very expensive in Finland. Polarisation is usually connected to the social division of the labour force according to salaries and the unemployment rate (Taimio 2004, 1). …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Everyday Well-Being in Connection with Health in Immigrant Families with Children-A Study on the Everyday Life of Families with Russian Background in Finland
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.