Building Bridges, Building Business: The Arab International Women's Forum Is Enhancing the Leadership Capacity of Arab Women by Promoting Their Role in the Economy and Public Life

By Al Kaylani, Haifa | International Trade Forum, July-October 2008 | Go to article overview

Building Bridges, Building Business: The Arab International Women's Forum Is Enhancing the Leadership Capacity of Arab Women by Promoting Their Role in the Economy and Public Life


Al Kaylani, Haifa, International Trade Forum


Despite the high education standards of Arab women, the female labour force participation is 32% lower than any other region in the world. The United Arab Emirates, for example, has the highest rate of females in higher education worldwide--a staggering 77%--yet 71% of unemployed people are women.

The barriers for many Arab women are similar to those in other areas of the world: lack of self-confidence, work-family conflict, long working hours, stereotyping and a lack of investment funding for women.

By fostering economic competitiveness, the Arab International Women's Forum (AIWF) supports sustainable human development and the empowerment of women. Founded in 2001 to serve as a voice for Arab women, the organization showcases their development, promotes cross-cultural diversity and creates greater public awareness of women's success and prospects.

By building bridges of understanding and business opportunities between governments, corporations and civil society--both internationally and within the Arab world--AIWF helps to enhance the leadership capacity of Arab women in all aspects of society.

"Engines of economic growth"

The organization has worked to enhance competitiveness in the Middle East and North Africa region by focusing on the role of Arab women as "engines of economic growth in the Arab world"--the title of a programme launched in 2005. At its heart is the belief that "there is no economic, political or social development in any society, without women playing their rightful role in their economies and their societies at large". AIWF's report from this programme makes recommendations on education opportunities and training programmes, entrepreneurial capacity building, public policy, financial resources and economic reform, partnership and corporate involvement.

By advocating for the political and economic inclusion of women in the Arab world, AIWF mobilizes action at the highest political levels and on the ground to advance the legislative rights and political participation of Arab women. With members and contacts in more than 45 countries, the organization has collaborated with such partners as the League of Arab States, the European Commission and European Parliament, the United Nations, the World Bank, the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development, women's business councils in the Arab states and the United Kingdom's Foreign and Commonwealth Office to help it achieve its aims.

Direct legislation is not the only solution. Lobbying for attitude change and codes of practice, and getting the political and business stakeholders to open up opportunities in various ways, can be the initial key.

Hala Bsaisu Lattouf, Minister for Social Development in Jordan, is proud of the fact that women are playing a role in shaping the future of their country and that women's representation has resulted in 16 Arab countries ratifying the Convention for the Elimination of Discrimination Against Women (see page 37).

Economic advancement through women's empowerment

The economic empowerment of women is at the heart of the forum's advocacy and programme strategies, which in 2007 examined the theme of globalization, trade and entrepreneurship. The programme saw the cities of London and Dubai collaborate, together with the wider financial community, to create a forum for the development of a multilateral corporate and public sector partnership. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Building Bridges, Building Business: The Arab International Women's Forum Is Enhancing the Leadership Capacity of Arab Women by Promoting Their Role in the Economy and Public Life
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.