Conspirator Perkin Warbeck Captured

By Bates, David | History Today, October 1997 | Go to article overview

Conspirator Perkin Warbeck Captured


Bates, David, History Today


Perkin Warbeck's capture in Beaulieu by Henry VII's troops marked the end of his 'reign' as the self-proclaimed Richard IV and exposed him as the imposter he really was. It was then that he finally confessed that he was not Edward V's brother, as he had claimed for six years, but was in fact descended from a Tournai boatman. By embarking on a number of conspiracies intended to topple Henry, Warbeck had been a major thorn in the king's side ever since he was mistaken -- deliberately or otherwise -- for the Duke of York in 1491.

In the aftermath of the Wars of the Roses, Henry's position remained precarious, as doubts persisted over his questionable claim to the throne taken after defeating Richard III at the Battle of Bosworth. Warbeck's web of deception began when he arrived in Cork, the seventeen-year-old servant of a Breton merchant. His confession alleges that after modelling the elegant silks that his master was selling, the locals insisted he must be Richard of York, the younger of the two princes Richard III was believed to have slain in 1483. The townsfolk managed to persuade Warbeck to embark on a conspiracy against the incumbent Henry VII and to take back the crown they thought was rightfully Richard's.

But it was the motives and opportunism of Henry's powerful enemies that catapulted Warbeck to prominence, as they saw him as a useful tool for their own machinations. Initially it was Charles VIII who saw merit in allying with an English conspirator while he was at war with England. However as soon as peace was declared between England and France with the Treaty of Etaples in November 1492, Warbeck was promptly expelled from France.

Warbeck sought refuge in the Low Countries where Edward IV's sister Margaret of Burgundy, readily welcomed him as her nephew. Furthermore, Holy Roman Emperor Maximilian who sought an ally against France, was infuriated by the Anglo-French treaty and thus condoned Warbeck's stay in the Low Countries. In response to this affirmation, Henry called off trade relations between England and the Low Countries in the summer of 1493. Indeed, Maximilian not only recognised Warbeck as the rightful king of England, but in 1495 'Richard IV' signed an agreement allowing the Emperor to become his heir to the English throne. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Conspirator Perkin Warbeck Captured
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.