The NEA Update

Negro History Bulletin, July-September 1997 | Go to article overview

The NEA Update


This column and future articles using the caption "The NEA Update" are designated by ASALH's national president, Dr. Edward Beasley, to acknowledge and recognize the National Education Association (NEA) for the contribution and support this organization has given to ASALH. The NEA's continued commitment exemplifies one of Dr. Carter G. Woodson's goal in establishing ASALH. This goal was to bring about harmony between the races and acceptance by interpreting the history of one to the other. Dr. Woodson's intent to resolve racial inequities through communication is jointly shared in harmony between the NEA and ASALH.

One of the activities shared between the two associations is an award presented during NEA's Annual Human and Civil Rights Awards Dinner at its national convention. A trophy is presented in honor of a colleague's achievements in the human rights struggle and in promoting the principles of Dr. Woodson. The 1997 Annual Human and Civil Rights Awards Dinner was held on July 4, 1997, at the Centennial Ballroom, Hyatt Regency, Atlanta, GA. Fourteen people received awards at this banquet.

NEA president Robert Chase and ASALH president Ed Beasley presented the Carter G. Woodson Memorial Award to Terry Thomas of Wed Palm Beach, FL. This award is annually given for leadership and creativity in promoting Black History Month, for furthering the understanding of African Americans' heritage, and for making significant positive changes in a local community. Persons interested in nomination information and forms for the 32nd Annual Human and Civil Rights Awards Dinner in 1998 in Anaheim, CA should write to the Human and Civil Rights Committee, National Education Association, 1201 Sixteenth Street, NW, Washington, DC 20036-3290. …

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