Recession Could Lead to Labor-Force Growth in 2009

By Tucker, Patrick | The Futurist, May-June 2009 | Go to article overview

Recession Could Lead to Labor-Force Growth in 2009


Tucker, Patrick, The Futurist


The U.S. labor force could rise considerably in 2009 and 2010. This means the number of people working and the number of people actively looking for work will increase. It means more people competing for jobs in the short term, adding to stress on U.S. job seekers. Increased competition also implies that the U.S. labor force will become more efficient as vacancies are filled by higher-caliber employees.

This scenario runs somewhat counter to recent trends. However, looking at previous forecasts in the light of the present situation does yield some surprising insights.

First, here's what the data say today:

* The labor force is shrinking. U.S. labor force participation was 65% in January 2009 which was down slightly. This means 65% of the population who were legally old enough to work and younger than the retirement age were either working or seeking work.

* More people are on the periphery of the working world. About 2.1 million people were marginally attached to the labor force in January, about 400,000 more than 12 months earlier, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS). "These individuals wanted and were available for work and had looked for a job sometime in the prior 12 months. They were not counted as unemployed because they had not searched for work in the [four] weeks preceding the survey," the Bureau reported.

* Discouragement is growing. Among the marginally attached individuals, some 270,000 more workers were identified as "discouraged" than a year before, meaning they did not believe any work was available to them and had not looked for work in the four weeks leading up to the survey. There were 734,000 discouraged workers in the United States in January 2009.

Given these dismal statistics about some very discouraged people, how is it possible that the number of Americans participating in the labor force will stop moving down and instead start moving up? For answers, it becomes necessary to look at what people were forecasting before the downturn, when economic trends pointed upward toward more uninterrupted economic growth.

* Boom times were causing some young people to opt out of the work scene. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Recession Could Lead to Labor-Force Growth in 2009
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.