The World of Paperbacks

Contemporary Review, Winter 2008 | Go to article overview

The World of Paperbacks


JOHN MURRAY has recently published a paperback of Donald Thomas' Freedom's Frontier: Censorship in Modern Britain ([pounds sterling]10.99), an important book which exposes the hypocrisy of the contemporary liberal intelligentsia's claim to free speech. Also from Murray we have: James Hamilton's London Lights: The Minds that Moved the City that Shook the World ([pounds sterling]10.99), a study of London's development during the first hall of the nineteenth century; Marcus Rediker's The Slave Ship: A Human History ([pounds sterling]9.99), a study of the vessels and men who transported Africa's slaves to a new slavery in America; Leo McKinstry's Spitfire: Portrait of a Legend ([pounds sterling]8.99) which the reviewer in this journal wrote 'may well become the definitive history of this extraordinary aircraft'; Prof. R.J.Q. Adams' Balfour: the Last Grandee ([pounds sterling]12.99), a learned biography of one of our more interesting Prime Ministers; Anne Sebba's Jennie Churchill: Winston's American Mother ([pounds sterling]8.99), a well researched biography of this extraordinary, if not totally admirable, woman; and, finally, another volume of James Lees-Milne's Diaries, 1971-1983 ([pounds sterling]12.99) abridged and edited by Michael Bloch, the diarist's literary executor. Mr Bloch has abridged the five volumes which cover this period to a quarter of their original length.

Karl Jung was always fascinated by the occult and ROUTLEDGE has brought out a new edition of his Psychology and the Occult ([pounds sterling]9.89) which was originally published in 1982. This is a collection of nine writings which embodies Jung's developing thoughts on this fascinating topic. A second religious title is the Encyclopedia of New Religious Movements ([pounds sterling]24.99) edited by Prof. Peter B. Clarke in which he argues that globalisation has helped to increase the proliferation of these new and frequently bizarre movements.

From PHOENIX we have Tim He-aid's Princess Margaret: A Life Unravelled ([pounds sterling]9.99), a sympathetic and objective biography of the late Princess. Given the recent revelations about the Earl of Snowdon's role in their marriage there will be increased sympathy for her. Also from Phoenix we have Sir Roy Strong's A Little History of the English Country Church ([pounds sterling]9.99), a delightful history that is also a celebration of an essential part of English civilisation, Andrew Lycett's Conan Doyle: The Man Who Created. Sherlock Holmes ([pounds sterling]10.99) whose hardback edition was hailed in this journal as 'the best and ... certainly the fullest' biography of the writer; and, Martin H. Manswer's The Secret Life of the English Language: Buttering Parsnips, Twocking Chavs ([pounds sterling]7.99), a fascinating collection of interesting facts about contemporary English. Finally, it has been said that a conservative is a liberal who has been mugged: Andrew Anthony's The Fallout: How a Guilty Liberal Lost His Innocence ([pounds sterling]8.99) is a challenging and rewarding read by a card-carrying liberal journalist who began to question the liberal agenda after '9/11'.

Among new titles from VINTAGE BOOKS we have Piers Brendon's The Decline and Fall of the British Empire 1781-1997 ([pounds sterling]9.99) which argues that the Empire's underlying commitment to parliamentary liberties meant its decline and fall were guaranteed even as it grew and prospered.

VINTAGE CLASSICS have brought out Arthur Conan Doyle's famous novel, The Hound of the Baskervilles and have included with it not only the short story, The Adventure. of the Speckled Band, which Doyle judged his best story, but an introduction by Ruth Rendell and all for [pounds sterling]5.99. Three more Jane Austen titles have recently been released: Persuasion, Mansfield Park, and Northanger Abbey, each priced at a reasonable [pounds sterling]4.99 along with two Graham Greene novels: Travels With My Aunt ([pounds sterling]7. …

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