No Magic Numbers


At its fifty-first session, the General Assembly received from the Secretary-General a report on the implementation of the Declaration on International Economic Cooperation, adopted in 1990, and the International Development Strategy for the Fourth United Nations Development Decade, adopted the same year. These are the "policy concerns" reflected in that report.

The first half of the 1990s has been characterized by a number of idiosyncratic trends. Arguably the most important has been the increased globalization and liberalization of the world economy. The former has taken several forms. First, there is the fact that international trade has been growing at a rapid rate. In just five years, the total value of world merchandise exports increased from 13 per cent of gross world product in 1990 to 17 per cent in 1995.

Secondly, international capital flows have increased dramatically in the same five-year period. For example, foreign direct investment in developing countries more than tripled between 1990 and 1995. Thirdly, firms are becoming increasingly "internationalized", setting up branches wherever costs are lowest and often using multiple production sites to avoid non-tariff barriers and minimize production costs. Fourthly, regional trading arrangements or trading blocs continue to proliferate. Lending special significance to trade concerns is the fact that this is the first such assessment since the follow-up activities associated with the conclusion of the Uruguay Round of multilateral trade negotiations, in which developing countries played a pivotal role.

A second characteristic of the first half of the Fourth United Nations Development Decade has been the continuation of relatively high real interest rates in industrialized countries. While long-term rates have actually fallen since the 1980s, historically they remain at quite high levels - especially when compared to the post-Second World War period until the end of the 1970s.

A third notable feature has been a resurgence of faith in the efficacy of the market. Thus, in an increasing number of countries, free-market advocates have urged Governments to be non-interventionist and concentrate only on providing public goods and "getting the basics right". …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

No Magic Numbers
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.