Plymouth Rocks the Movie Industry; a Mega Green Movie Studio in Massachusetts Aims to Be "Hollywood East"

By Guilfoil, John M. | E Magazine, January-February 2009 | Go to article overview

Plymouth Rocks the Movie Industry; a Mega Green Movie Studio in Massachusetts Aims to Be "Hollywood East"


Guilfoil, John M., E Magazine


In October 2008, voters at a Plymouth, Massachusetts, town meeting handily approved two measures to allow construction to move forward on the $400 million Plymouth Rock film studios. The vote not only settled months of negotiation between the town and studio execs, but it also paved the way for what will be the movie-industry leader in sustainable and green practices and design standards.

A few weeks before the vote, Plymouth Rock Studios announced it had registered its entire development project with the United States Green Building Council (USGBC) and would be pursuing Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) certification. This means that Plymouth Rock Studios, slated to open in 2010, will be the world's first totally green movie studio.

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

"This is Hollywood East" says Steven Taylor, artist-in-residence at the studio. "We will be the center of innovation in entertainment for the entire East Coast, and a leader in environmentally advanced smart technologies."

One of the studio's two founders, David Kirkpatrick, says, "Our mission is to promote imagination and possibility, and we're proud to complement this vision with a progressive, environmentally friendly movie studio. By pursuing LEED certification, we will create a holistic, state-of-the-art facility in Plymouth, and ensure that Massachusetts is a pioneer in sustainable, green practices."

LEED is an independent, third-party certification system and is the nationally accepted benchmark for the design, construction and operation of buildings, as set by the USGBC. Architects, realtors, building managers, engineers, interior designers, landscape architects, construction managers, lenders and government officials use the program on new and old buildings alike. In the U.S., buildings account for 72% of electrical consumption, 38% of C[O.sub.2] emissions and 30% (136 million tons annually) of waste output, according to the council. The LEED process seeks to manage those factors.

Plymouth Rock Studios is aiming for complete carbon neutrality. To get there, they have brought in Gensler, a top global architecture, design and planning firm with 31 offices on five continents. "Gensler is thrilled to be part of this transformational project in the leadership of sustainable design practices in the entertainment industry and New England region," says Douglas C. Gensler, the managing director of the firm's Boston office.

Gensler's plan is to include sustainable materials in the construction of buildings on the campus, low-impact design strategies, geothermal energy, daylight capture, organic gardens and water-reuse systems.

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

"In creating a green environment, the Plymouth Rock Studios team has taken great care in their design to minimize site disturbance, use energy-efficient mechanical equipment and plan the site in a way that maximizes the appropriation of natural light," says the firm's website. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • A full archive of books and articles related to this one
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Plymouth Rocks the Movie Industry; a Mega Green Movie Studio in Massachusetts Aims to Be "Hollywood East"
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.