Using the ASSIST Short Form for Evaluating an Information Technology Application: Validity and Reliability Issues

By Speth, Carol A.; Namuth, Deana M. et al. | Informing Science: the International Journal of an Emerging Transdiscipline, Annual 2007 | Go to article overview

Using the ASSIST Short Form for Evaluating an Information Technology Application: Validity and Reliability Issues


Speth, Carol A., Namuth, Deana M., Lee, Donald J., Informing Science: the International Journal of an Emerging Transdiscipline


Introduction

The Library of Crop Technology is a collection of web-based learning objects developed initially at a large mid-western American university with help from other universities and funding agencies to provide peer-reviewed, unbiased science-based information about biotechnology and other plant science topics to students in either resident or distance courses, participants in extension or outreach activities, and members of the public. University instructors, community college teachers, adult educators, high school science and agriculture teachers, agronomists, seed company sales representatives, industry trainers, crop consultants, journalists, dieticians, and nutritionists have used it. It has now been expanded and renamed the Plant and Soil Sciences eLibrary (Namuth, Fritz, King, & Boren, 2005).

Formative evaluations of the lessons included a volunteer group of students interested in crop genetic engineering and students in two semesters of an introductory genetics course (Hain, 1999). Students were interviewed and asked open-ended questions about their learning strategies relative to six features of the lessons: objectives, text, images, animations, glossary and quizzes.

As the database of lessons and topics grew, the developers' interest in self-reported strategies evolved into a research program including students at several universities who were using the learning objects library. This research program made it possible to assemble a larger and more heterogeneous sample and, as a side effect, get a better sense of the reliability and validity of the ASSIST scales. Those results are reported here.

Validity and Reliability

Two indicators of quality for any kind of mental measurement are validity and reliability. According to Allen and Yen (1979, p. 95), "A test has validity if it measures what it purports to measure," and "Validity can be assessed in several ways, depending on the test and its intended use." Richardson (2004, p. 353) stated that, "Any research instrument should be validated from scratch in each new context in which it is used." According to the StatsDirect Limited (2006b) online dictionary of statistics terms, located at http://www.camcode.com/help/validity.htm, for laboratory experiments with tightly controlled conditions, it is easier to achieve high internal validity than for studies in difficult to control environments (like classrooms).

The other hallmark of quality in the measurement world, reliability, means that the test or questionnaire measures what it claims to measure consistently, either in terms of consistency over time, or that the items combined to produce scores have high enough positive inter-item correlations to produce meaningful scores. A coefficient of reliability can be calculated based on various formulas (Allen & Yen, 1979, pp. 72-92). Lee Cronbach of Stanford University developed one commonly used formula for calculating the internal consistency of items on a scale, called Cronbach's alpha or [alpha]. According to StatsDirect Limited (2006a), located at http://www.camcode.com/help/reliability.htm, by convention, an alpha of 0.80 is considered adequate for many purposes. But the adequacy of a coefficient of reliability depends on the type of scale and the purposes for which the scores are being used. One example, from outside the approaches to studying literature, comes from Schott and Bellin, (2001, p. 88) who were interested in questionnaires measuring self-concept, and who considered reliabilities of 0.69 to 0.77 acceptable.

Koohang (2004) reported development of a new instrument to facilitate evaluation of the usability of digital libraries. He addressed the issue of construct validity by doing a principal components factor analysis of the items, and found his items all addressed one trait. The internal consistency of his scale was 0.96. This study describes a similar process, but the ASSIST had a longer history, with adaptations for new purposes and modifications to widen its theoretical base. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Using the ASSIST Short Form for Evaluating an Information Technology Application: Validity and Reliability Issues
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.