Ministers Must Ensure Country's Shipping Industry Doesn't End Up All at Sea

Cape Times (South Africa), May 13, 2009 | Go to article overview

Ministers Must Ensure Country's Shipping Industry Doesn't End Up All at Sea


The new ministers of transport and of public enterprises have begun work, each with a deputy minister nogal.

Once the dust has settled, one hopes that from the sea of new faces at both national and provincial government levels, someone will emerge as a real champion for the shipping industry.

As more than 90 percent of the country's trade is seaborne, and large volumes of grain are imported to feed both locals and our neighbours, shipping is far more important than even the taxi industry to the South African economy, yet it is often ignored by the government.

Hailing from KwaZulu-Natal with two major ports - Durban, the busiest in Africa, and Richards Bay, handling the most cargo tonnage-wise in Africa - Transport Minister Sbu Ndebele will be aware of the importance of shipping, and will need to deal with issues that seem to be lingering on the back-burner.

Besides tonnage tax legislation - currently lost in Pretoria's bureaucratic maze - and the raft of associated issues that need attention, the legal beagles will hasten to point out other aspects of maritime-related legislation that need urgent review.

He will also need to explain to his cabinet colleague, Minister of Higher Education and Training Blade Nzimande, that the country's maritime training and certification system, including the standards maintained by tertiary institutions, must comply with international standards if South African certificates of competency in navigation or marine engineering or even cooking at sea are to be recognised internationally.

At present, South Africa appears on the so-called "white list", indicating that local training and certification systems do comply with the International Maritime Organisation's high standards.

To maintain those standards, experienced sea-going officers need to be attracted to lecture at maritime training institutions, with one of the incentives being salaries that are comparable with the norms in the shipping industry.

Among the criteria that are audited with international maritime training standards as the benchmark are the relevant qualifications and experience of lecturers, and appointments to these institutions based on other criteria will not wash with the auditors.

A negative audit report could result in South Africa being removed from the white list, which would spell disaster for hundreds of South African seafarers, whose certificates could not be revalidated, as well as new entrants who would be disqualified from their chosen career at sea. It would also trash any ideas of large numbers of South Africans gaining sea-going employment to alleviate the unemployment problem.

So it is of fundamental importance that the ministers concerned do all in their power to ensure that the country's white-list status is retained.

Entrusted with the public enterprises portfolio, into which Transnet falls, the highly rated Barbara Hogan will understand the importance of efficient ports to the country.

Commendable has been Transnet's considerable expenditure on port infrastructural development, mainly in container terminals, tug construction programmes and other special projects such as the widening of Durban harbour entrance and Ngqura harbour which, we are told, will come on stream in October. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • A full archive of books and articles related to this one
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Ministers Must Ensure Country's Shipping Industry Doesn't End Up All at Sea
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.