Rodney McMillian: The Kitchen

By Sholis, Brian | Artforum International, January 2009 | Go to article overview

Rodney McMillian: The Kitchen


Sholis, Brian, Artforum International


"The challenge of the next half century," said Lyndon B. Johnson at the University of Michigan in 1964, "is whether we have the wisdom to use [our] wealth to enrich and elevate our national life, and to advance the quality of our American civilization." Los Angeles-based artist Rodney McMillian, who in recent years has delivered Johnson's famous "Great Society" speech at numerous art venues, might argue that the past fifty years have not lived up to the former president's hopeful vision. McMillian's art has, without seeming merely didactic, patiently explored the social fissures--in particular, those along racial and economic lines--that still rend our "great" society. At the Kitchen, the artist presented an installation (inspired by Cormac McCarthy's postapocalyptic novel The Road) that drew on the power of sacred architecture to elevate his secular concerns. On their own, the paintings, sculptures, and photographs may seem somewhat abstract, largely divorced from current events. Considered in the context of McMillian's earlier artworks, however, they become a forceful, plangent lament for the degrading inequities many in America still encounter every day.

Five mural-size, bannerlike paintings hung on the walls of the gallery; interspersed among them were columns of framed black-and-white photographs, found at flea markets and antique stores, depicting anonymous individuals and couples young and old. At the center of the space rested a dirty old rug and an armchair, both doused with red paint, beneath a six-pointed canopy made of white paper and tape. A pile of Internet printouts of nursery-rhyme lyrics ("John Brown Had a Little Soldier," "Baa Baa Black Sheep"--intoned by an actor during a performance at the show's opening reception--was laid on the chair. The unstretched paintings depict part of a brick house, tree branches, and what may be interpreted (somewhat liberally) as a figure being torn apart; all are awash in scarlet. A fourth canvas is an abstract agglomeration of red, white, and black paint that resembles viscera. …

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