Parents, Prize Winners and More

By Hartnett, Judy Faust | District Administration, May 2009 | Go to article overview

Parents, Prize Winners and More


Hartnett, Judy Faust, District Administration


A LEARNING SPECIALIST FROM THE CHICAGO AREA SHARED HER DISAPPOINTMENT with me when all but one parent were "no shows" on open school night last fall. Although it's more likely that day-to-day involvement such as reading and communicating with one's child and being aware of his or her study habits make the biggest difference, in "Parental Engagement Pays Off" we sought out district programs that are working to inspire parents and at least get the ball rolling by making that initial home-school connection.

As an example, an outreach activity was planned at a local mosque for the Bengali, Gujarati and Hindi Islamic communities in the North Penn (Pa.) School District, where seventy-one languages are spoken, to help explain school policies and procedures. At Knapp Elementary School participation of parents in conferences with teachers has increased substantially as a result of these engagement efforts. As administrators adopt policies to enhance parental engagement in their schools, familiarizing themselves with the facets of parental involvement that can help raise achievement the most in their districts, perhaps parents will better understand that they are part of the integral piece needed to raise achievement and graduation rates in our schools.

For this issue, associate editor Don Parker-Burgard asked Paul Vallas, superintendent, Louisiana Recovery School District, and Rudy Crew, professor of clinical education, Rossier School of Education at USC, and most recently the superintendent of Miami-Dade County Public Schools, to weigh in on the Detroit Public Schools crisis. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Parents, Prize Winners and More
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.