Web Site Renovations: A Cost-Effective Tool for Tough Times

By Algeri, Robert | Strategies: The Journal of Legal Marketing, April 2009 | Go to article overview

Web Site Renovations: A Cost-Effective Tool for Tough Times


Algeri, Robert, Strategies: The Journal of Legal Marketing


There comes a point in the life cycle of every Web site when it begins to feel dated. Design elements that were once cutting-edge now seem trite. The text no longer hits the mark. The site no longer works the way you want.

Does this mean that you need an entirely new Web site?

Perhaps. However, there often is a viable alternative: a renovation. Think of a Web site renovation as a tune-up that will help make your current site become a more effective business-development tool. A renovation preserves what is good about your existing site--and then improves areas that are falling short. You'd be surprised what a few nips and a tuck can do.

A Web site renovation often includes one or more of the following:

# Homepage Redesign: The homepage is often the focus of a renovation, and rightly so. Studies show that visitors will judge your company within 50 milliseconds of arriving at your homepage. A firm with an outdated Web site runs the risk of appearing hopelessly out of touch.

Typical homepage design improvements include: adding larger and more striking photos, rewriting the headline and text, tightening the layout and adding subtle Flash motion graphics.

# Messaging Improvements: Oftentimes, a Web site's design is good--the messaging just needs to be updated or improved in a few areas. Most messaging improvements are made to reflect new services, changing market conditions or an evolving firm.

# New Pages and Sections: As a firm grows, its Web site may need to expand to include new practice areas, an improved careers section, new client case studies and, of course, additional attorney profiles.

# Streamlining Navigation: Sometimes, rearranging where pages are found on your Web site can make all of the difference. Slight changes can allow users to more easily find the information they are looking for, while driving them to the articles, case studies or biographies that best make the case for your firm.

# Functionality Enhancements: It's likely that since your Web site was originally built, technology has evolved and user expectations are now greater. …

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