Popes Looked Away as Holy Men Raped in the Name of God

Daily Mail (London), May 21, 2009 | Go to article overview

Popes Looked Away as Holy Men Raped in the Name of God


Byline: by Nell McCafferty

GOD is not mentioned in this report. At all times, the objective was to protect the religious institutions and orders. So absent is God, that this could have been a report on abuse of money by bankers.

Children were raped by priests and brothers and Bishops the length and breadth of the island of Ireland, this last 60 years, and the sole response of the Holy Men was to protect themselves, each other, and their collective superficially good name.

Bankers are resigning, reluctantly. People, politicians and investors have pressured them to do so. Money talks.

No Holy Man has resigned yet. Thousands of children screamed as the Holy Men raped them but Bishop Magee of Cloyne, explaining why he was still doing nothing about that up to a few weeks ago, said that he was still on a learning curve. And he is still Bishop.

One explanation of our seeming lassitude in face of mass rape by the Holy Men is that the faithful are clinging to God. They have to put up with the Holy Men in order to get access to God, and they bear this burden with fortitude. Confirmation and First Communion ceremonies are taking place throughout the land right now. What can a believing parent do, other than keep the child close between the church entrance and the altar rails? Deny the child induction and you deny the child a place at a local preferred school. Holy Men have power still, and they do not hesitate to use it, shamelessly, with gusto.

For instance, and the mind boggles at this, the Holy Men insist that anyone who dies without baptism goes to Limbo. The unbaptised one will never see the face of God. That is an article of faith drawn up by the Holy Men.

My sister died 70 years ago, without baptism, within an hour of birth - my mother was fighting for her own life at the time - and the priest who finally blessed the unconsecrated ground into which she was consigned without ceremony, said recently that nothing else could be done about the baby's fate. Priests who rape children are still in with a chance of seeing the face of God, because the priests were baptised.

Those are the man-made rules of the Holy Men. Nonsense, you might say - and you sensibly will - but that rule is still in place. A Vatican committee of investigation into Limbo ruled two years ago that the rule still holds.

One way round might be to baptise the child in the womb. That would reinforce the Church rules of abortion, but that's what deals are about - compromise - and it could be a way round the limbo issue. For instance, because there is a shortage of priests in Knock, and the faithful cannot get Knock water blessed to make it Holy, the Church came up with an ingenious solution. …

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