PINK CRAWL FOR CANCER; Historic Maryborough Ensures Its Place on the Map with Fifth Annual Record Attempt. Research into Modern Scourge of Women's Health Gets Significant Boost with Charge around Town's Pubs

The Morning Bulletin (Rockhampton, Australia), May 23, 2009 | Go to article overview

PINK CRAWL FOR CANCER; Historic Maryborough Ensures Its Place on the Map with Fifth Annual Record Attempt. Research into Modern Scourge of Women's Health Gets Significant Boost with Charge around Town's Pubs


MARYBOROUGH will head for the pubs on June 7, calling on all true blue Aussies to help make sure the city upholds its Guinness World Record for the biggest pub crawl on the planet.

Excitement is already bubbling away in Maryborough ahead the historic city's fifth assault on the World's Greatest Pub Crawl.

Every crawl is a fiesta of weird and wacky costumes, but this year's event will come with a twist - publicans and pub crawlers will literally paint the town pink.

The pub crawl has nominated the McGrath Foundation as its charity this year in memory of cricket Glenn McGrath's late wife, Jane. Pink is now the signature colour.

Last year more than 3000 official drinkers were recorded at the pub crawl. The Flintstones, the Grim Reaper, some pink wigged "ladettes" and a massive team of ping-pong players were some of the crazy costumed characters among the huge crowd.

This year 14 stops are on the official pub crawl cards. To qualify, crawlers must sink at least one drink, alcoholic or non-alcoholic, in at least 10 pubs in seven hours.

Cards must be stamped at each pub of choice and dropped in the barrel at the end of the day.

Maryborough set the inaugural world record in 2005, with 1198 cards completed. It racked up 2237 in 2006 before briefly losing the title to a London challenge, which registered 2278.

In 2007 Maryborough easily eclipsed London's pub crawl, with 2851 pub crawlers handing in their stamped cards verifying where they had been.

Publican Clay Clayton, whose Criterion and Post Office hotels date back to 1864 and 1870, said he was confident 2009 would be the biggest year ever.

"This is a massive event that is based on an old favourite Aussie tradition. …

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