Colleges Must Embrace Web 2.0; Report Calls on University Lecturers to Meet Challenge of Online Technology

Western Mail (Cardiff, Wales), May 28, 2009 | Go to article overview

Colleges Must Embrace Web 2.0; Report Calls on University Lecturers to Meet Challenge of Online Technology


Byline: Katie Norman

ACADEMICS and universities need to consider using platforms like Facebook and Twitter to communicate with students, a report has claimed.

The recommendation was among the findings of the Committee of Inquiry into the Changing Learner Experience, which was tasked with assessing the impact of Web 2.0 on higher education.

Web 2.0 is the term used to describe interactive online technologies, including information sharing and social networking sites like YouTube, Bebo, Facebook, Twitter and wikis.

Among those on the committee was the University of Glamorgan's pro vice-chancellor Julie Lydon, who believes academics need to be prepared to interact with students using Web 2.0 technologies.

"Some already do but I think we will see more of that and I think we will see it being used in productive ways to genuinely help students learn," she said.

"We need to recognise that students themselves have a role to play in developing how we use these technologies. For example, how blogs can best be used for the benefit of students." Led by Sir David Melville, the former vice-chancellor of the University of Kent, the committee spoke to lecturers, experts, other committees and students of a range of ages.

It found most students were now highly accomplished at using Web 2.0 sites, often factoring them into their daily routines and regularly using them for research purposes, while their tutors and lecturers were in some cases lagging behind.

Mrs Lydon said: "The digital divide is part of the reality.

"We are not the same as these young people. We haven't got the same expertise in these areas.

We are not as familiar, in particular with social networking sites, and we have some differences as to where our capabilities and expectations lie." Mrs Lydon believes Web 2.0 is rapidly redefining not only the way in which students interact with each other, but also how they learn and the relationship they have with tutors.

"For me, it's raising questions about what students expect of academic teachers," she said..

"If you go back 10 years ago, the expectation was that the teacher was the fount of all knowledge - they were the people who could direct you to appropriate sources of information. Whereas now, through things like Google and Wikipedia, you put in a string of key words and you get a plethora of information sources. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Colleges Must Embrace Web 2.0; Report Calls on University Lecturers to Meet Challenge of Online Technology
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.