Black Farmers Have Beef with the USDA: Loan Denials Spark Legislation Proposal to Protect African American Farmers

By Smith, Kelly | Black Enterprise, January 1998 | Go to article overview

Black Farmers Have Beef with the USDA: Loan Denials Spark Legislation Proposal to Protect African American Farmers


Smith, Kelly, Black Enterprise


In December, members of the National Black Farmers Association (NBFA) held a march in front of the White House--complete with tractors and a mule--to mark the one-year anniversary of their ongoing grass-roots battle against more than three decades of documented discrimination by the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) and its employees. Led by John Boyd Jr., 33, of the NBFA, the group alleges that loan officers who dole out USDA loans to farmers have largely ignored black farmers. The USDA's failure to investigate their civil rights complaints, the group contends, has denied the farmers access to government-backed loans and forced thousands from their land. Indeed, the percentage of black farmers has dwindled from 14% in 1920 to less than 1% in 1997.

But now, politicians are listening. Agriculture Secretary Dan Glickman has frozen foreclosures on farms where the owner has filed a discrimination complaint. The investigation has taken so long partly because the USDA closed its civil rights division in 1983. He now hopes to have the civil rights enforcement unit fully reinstated early this year.

Boyd also alleges that despite the heightened attention, black farmers received only 4% of the $1.9 billion in farm ownership loans issued by the USDA in fiscal year 1997. In addition, no black farmers received any of the 161 emergency loans doled out during that same time period. But according to a spokesman at the USDA, by law, emergency loans can be distributed only to farmers in federally declared disaster areas. …

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