Simon Has Designs on Teaching Skills to Others

Liverpool Echo (Liverpool, England), June 20, 2009 | Go to article overview

Simon Has Designs on Teaching Skills to Others


Byline: EMMA THOMPSON

NOT many people can say they work in a job that gives them creative freedom and allows them to stamp their own personal unique style onto their work.

But Simon Melhuish is one of a lucky few who have the privilege of working in their dream job - in his case, as a designer for Brava Design, in Liverpool.

Brava Design is a creative social enterprise which specialises in imaginative graphic and web design based in Blackburne House on Hope Street, Liverpool city centre.

Said Simon: "Landing the job with Brava Design was a dream come true.

"I was attracted to the company because they are a passionate, creative, social enterprise. They make lots of wonderful, beautiful designs, all based around a strong social ethos." Simon has always seen himself as a bright and artistic person, and, with a keen interest in technological advancements, it was inevitable he would land a job that allowed him to express his ideas through the aid of computer technology.

He explained: "I think I've always been a really creative person, and I knew I would end up in a job where I could use my imagination. I have always loved design, but it wasn't until I started using computers that I realised this was the perfect way to express myself. So I guess that was the start. I think, originally, I wanted to get into computer animation." Landing his ideal job did not come easily; Simon had to put a lot of time and effort into his studies.

Simon added: "When I left secondary school, I went to Liverpool Community College Art Centre and attained a BTEC in Multimedia, which was the real foundation for everything I have done since; I went on from there to study Computer Animation at Teesside University. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Simon Has Designs on Teaching Skills to Others
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.