Preventing War and Disorder: "Preventive Diplomacy" Emulates Public-Health Strategies

By Hines, Andy | The Futurist, September-October 1997 | Go to article overview

Preventing War and Disorder: "Preventive Diplomacy" Emulates Public-Health Strategies


Hines, Andy, The Futurist


"Preventive diplomacy" emulates public-health strategies.

Diplomacy, like health care, is focusing increasingly on prevention rather than treatment. The diplomats want to stop violent conflicts before they start.

The end of the Cold War may have encouraged ethnic uprisings, but it has also enabled the international community to act collectively, according to the contributors to a new book, Preventive Diplomacy, edited by Kevin M. Cahill, a physician and medical consultant to the United Nations. Preventive diplomacy seeks to address the root causes of conflicts rather than wait until violence erupts and peacekeepers need to be sent in.

The book, based on papers presented at a United Nations symposium, offers the model of public health as a new organizing principle for diplomacy. The hope is that great successes of the international community in improving public health, such as the eradication of smallpox, can be adapted by diplomats. Prevention's proactive nature differentiates it from traditional diplomacy, which reacts to problems after they arise. Cahill and his colleagues argue that detection and early intervention to prevent conflicts and crises should be as honored in international relations as crisis management and political negotiation.

Cahill writes that "the sources of human stress, community breakdown, and group violence are far too diverse and too deeply embedded in social change to be consigned to the windowless compartments of conventional diplomacy." The diverse sources require help from many different disciplines, including medicine, so that prevention calls for a "symphony" of actions by including statesmen, businessmen, journalists, international organizations, bankers, nongovernmental organizations, and so on - rather than a solo performance by traditional diplomacy.

The United Nations is the logical "conductor" of the symphony, but it needs a great deal of help. International support is justified not only on moral grounds, but on economic ones: Preventive diplomacy would be cheaper than peacekeeping, whose annual cost is soaring, up 12-fold between 1986 and 1993.

"Preventing conflict requires different skills from resolving conflict," notes Cahill's colleague, Lord David Owen, a former Minister of Health and Foreign Secretary of the United Kingdom. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • A full archive of books and articles related to this one
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Preventing War and Disorder: "Preventive Diplomacy" Emulates Public-Health Strategies
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.