The Priest Won: Many and Sometimes Tortuous Are the Paths to Rome. Few Are Stuffed with as Much Contradiction (or as Much Logic) as the Path Pursued Seventy-Six Years Ago by the British Writer and Mountaineer Sir Arnold Lunn

By Fry, John | Commonweal, June 5, 2009 | Go to article overview

The Priest Won: Many and Sometimes Tortuous Are the Paths to Rome. Few Are Stuffed with as Much Contradiction (or as Much Logic) as the Path Pursued Seventy-Six Years Ago by the British Writer and Mountaineer Sir Arnold Lunn


Fry, John, Commonweal


Before his conversion, Lunn was one of the most vigorous intellects writing in the English language against Roman Catholicism. After his conversion, he was as articulate an apologist as ever served the church. He was spectacularly catapulted from one extreme to the other in 1932 with the publication of the book Difficulties.

Today Lunn is best known in the sport of skiing as the inventor of the modern slalom race. His close friend William F. Buckley Jr., who met him on the slopes, described him as standing "about five feet ten inches ... his hair thick, unruly, and white ... his face weather-beaten red. He spoke with animation and laughed a cackly laugh after every sentence or two, almost always provoking in his listeners similar laughter."

He was the eldest son of Henry Lunn, an ardent Methodist and head of a British travel agency, which had originated in the work of organizing Christian conferences in the Swiss Alps. The young man became a fervent skier and climber, and his adoration of the mountains soon became mixed with religious feelings. When he was nineteen years old, he found himself "resting on an Alpine pass after a climb and a sunset of supreme beauty. Suddenly I knew beyond immediate need of proof that a beauty which was not of this world was revealed in the visible loveliness of the mountains. From that moment I discarded materialism for ever."

He did not discard his skepticism, though, and he feasted on controversy. His first book, The Harrovians, scandalized Britain's upper class by pulling back the curtains on the life of a schoolboy in an elite public school. Following his studies at Oxford, he took up a writer's career, and between 1907 and 1968 he produced more than fifty books. In addition to those on skiing, mountaineering, and travel, about a third were on philosophical and religious topics. Anyone considering entering (or leaving) the Roman Catholic faith today could do worse than read such Lunn works as Now I See and Roman Converts.

Lunn initially focused on the Oxford Movement, which continued in full swing after World War I. In the view of the Tractarian members of the Oxford Movement, the Anglican Church was consumed by secularism, beholden to the state, and in decline. A true church should be imbued with loftier spiritual values. But Lunn saw frightful flaws in the reasoning of those who turned to Rome for their salvation. They came under his withering scrutiny in his 1924 book Roman Converts. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • A full archive of books and articles related to this one
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

The Priest Won: Many and Sometimes Tortuous Are the Paths to Rome. Few Are Stuffed with as Much Contradiction (or as Much Logic) as the Path Pursued Seventy-Six Years Ago by the British Writer and Mountaineer Sir Arnold Lunn
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.