China Expands Trade, Relations to Africa

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), June 30, 2009 | Go to article overview

China Expands Trade, Relations to Africa


Byline: Greg Houle, SPECIAL TO THE WASHINGTON TIMES

It is well known that since China began to embrace capitalism in the late 1970s, its economy has, for the most part, raced forward at breakneck speed. Last year, China's economy ranked second in the world, behind only the United States.

In order to keep up the frantic pace of economic growth to which it has become accustomed, the formerly isolationist nation has begun to spread its wings. And largely driven by an intense need for more sources of energy, China has been using some of its vast holdings of foreign currency to invest in new opportunities abroad.

Nowhere has this Chinese expansion been felt more strongly than on the continent of Africa. Bilateral trade between the two regions increased from $10 billion in 2000 to $55 billion in 2006, and China recently has become Africa's second-largest trading partner. Over the past four years alone, Chinese government leaders have made seven tours of Africa and visited more than 30 nations on the continent. New direct airline routes have paved the way for thousands of Chinese entrepreneurs and opportunists to flood into Nigeria, Ethiopia, Cameroon and a dozen or more other African nations to seek their fortunes in this brave new capitalistic world thousands of miles from home.

So far, the Chinese adventure into Africa has, with the exception of some xenophobic attitudes on both sides, gone off without much of a hitch. The Chinese get to extract what they are seeking so desperately - mainly oil and other natural and mineral resources - and in return, they build roads and dams and provide cheap goods to their African hosts.

But what should we make of this neocolonization of the African continent by a single, increasingly powerful communist nation?

Serge Michel and Michel Beuret, two European journalists who have done extensive reporting from Africa, along with photographer Paolo Woods, try to answer this difficult but important question in China Safari: On the Trail of Beijing's Expansion in Africa.

First published in France last year, the book offers a series of witty vignettes derived from the authors' extensive reportage throughout the African continent and China. They write about the poor, provincial Chinese workers who travel thousands of miles from home to seek their fortunes in a modern-day gold rush. They report on the (mostly) grateful African government officials who eagerly accept Chinese offers of assistance in building infrastructure in return for a piece of their own valuable resources. And they glean some of the global response to China's aggressive actions in Africa, detailing some of the concern and, increasingly, the relief other governments feel toward China's involvement in the continent.

In the four or five decades since most African nations gained their independence, hundreds of billions of dollars of direct aid has been injected into these governments, mostly by Western governments. …

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