Old, Young No Longer See Eye to Eye; GENERATION GAP Study Finds Wider Differences in Social Values, Lifestyle

By Salman, Josh | The Florida Times Union, June 30, 2009 | Go to article overview

Old, Young No Longer See Eye to Eye; GENERATION GAP Study Finds Wider Differences in Social Values, Lifestyle


Salman, Josh, The Florida Times Union


Byline: JOSH SALMAN

Josephine Crewz doesn't own a cell phone. She doesn't use the Internet.

She places high regard on chivalry and attends church regularly.

The 74-year-old Jacksonville woman considers herself traditional in every sense of the word. She's noticed a drastic change in society since growing up in a large, Italian family in Brooklyn, N.Y. And despite raising 10 children of her own, she can't relate at all to today's younger generation.

"We were brought up the hard way," Crewz said. "These kids now have no responsibility. They worry too much about their Game Boys and what not."

Younger and older Americans see the world differently. The emergence of social networking and Internet technology has created the largest generation gap since the political clashes of the 1960s, according to a study released Monday by the Pew Research Center.

Almost eight in 10 people surveyed believe there's a major difference in the viewpoints of younger people and older people today, the highest spread since 1969, when respondents reported major differences in opinions over the Vietnam War and civil and women's rights. But unlike the political differences of the '60s, today's generations disagree over social values and morality, the study shows.

Adam Shapiro, chairman of the sociology department at the University of North Florida, attributes the gap to a rise in information technology. He also believes people now are more apt to interact with others their age, reducing communication across generations.

The rise of the age-exclusive retirement communities in Florida are but one example of this, he said.

"Generational differences increase as the pace of social change increases," Shapiro said. "Social change has increased rapidly, particularly over the past 30 [years].

"Given that young people are more apt to have been raised in the Internet era, their interactions, preferences, and values are more likely to have been shaped by this than persons of older ages."

PERCEPTION OF AGING

The study also revealed a difference in the perception of aging and suggests that life stages are becoming more distinct. Where there was once a divide between adults and youth, increasingly the divide is between youth, young adulthood, middle age and later life.

Each time Shapiro teaches a course on aging he asks students to describe what an "old person" is. Much like in the Pew study, younger persons mostly describe old people in very negative and stereotypical ways. Older persons typically give much more moderated responses, he said.

Americans can't agree on when you become an "old person," either. The average was age 69 for all respondents in the Pew study, but the under-30 group said it was at 60 - and those 65 and over said 74. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Old, Young No Longer See Eye to Eye; GENERATION GAP Study Finds Wider Differences in Social Values, Lifestyle
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.