S. Korea Mobilizes Maritime Squads; Reacts to North's Missile Launches

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), July 3, 2009 | Go to article overview

S. Korea Mobilizes Maritime Squads; Reacts to North's Missile Launches


Byline: Andrew Salmon, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

YEONGJONG ISLAND, South Korea -- On their island base in a tense Yellow Sea, black-clad commando squads armed with automatic weapons surge up ladders onto the deck of a training ship, fast-rope down building exteriors and detonate explosives.

The Special Sea Attack Team (SSAT), an elite South Korean Coast Guard unit tasked with countering maritime terrorism, is preparing to respond with tougher policies to North Korean shipping in response to North Korea's missile launches and its second nuclear test in May. North Korea fired four short-range missiles into waters off the east coast Thursday, Yonhap news agency reported.

We have not got word from above yet, said Inspector Joung Ku-so, who was suited in body armor and bristling with weapons. But we are practicing boarding drills for PSI, he said, referring to the U.S.-led Proliferation Security Initiative that aims to block ships from carrying weapons materials to the North.

North Korea is expected to test its long-range Taepodong-2 intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM) on Saturday, to coincide with Independence Day celebrations in the United States.

The PSI comprises more than 90 nations that have agreed to monitor and possibly inspect North Korean ships suspected of carrying illicit cargoes. Currently, a U.S. Navy destroyer is shadowing the North Korean freighter Kang Nam 1 in the South China Sea. The freighter's movements are also being monitored electronically at the South Korean Coast Guard station at Incheon.

Boarding a Coast Guard hovercraft off Incheon - South Korea's second-largest port and the location of its main international airport - for the 30-minute ride to the SSAT base, it is clear how dangerous these waters are. Coast Guard cutters mount 20 mm rotary chain guns; in the event of war, they would support naval operations.

The sea is gray and choppy, and fog often cuts visibility to zero. Mud flats and islands dot the estuary off Incheon, which lies just 20 miles south of the maritime border. Craft from South Korea, North Korea and China compete over the rich crab fishing.

Incheon was the scene of Gen. Douglas MacArthur's September 1950 seaborne landing that turned the tide of the 1950-1953 Korean War. Moreover, it was on an island off Incheon in 1969 where South Korea trained criminals in a Dirty Dozen -style unit in an attempt to assassinate North Korean leader Kim Il-sung. That incident was depicted in the hit 2003 South Korean film Silmido. Mr. Kim died of natural causes in 1994.

In June 1999 and June 2002, North Korea initiated naval clashes in these waters, killing six South Korean sailors. At the time, governments in Seoul were following an engagement sunshine policy toward Pyongyang and withheld policies and comments that could antagonize the North.

Now, under the leadership of conservative President Lee Myung-bak, policies are tougher.

The guidelines for rules of engagement have changed, said Coast Guard spokesman Yun Byeong-du. In the past, vessels had to get permission from the Blue House [presidential residence] to retaliate. Now it is up to captains. The Coast Guard is just the front line in the toughest South Korean defense posture in more than a decade.

Last week, the defense ministry told the nation's parliament that South Korea was boosting its pre-emptive strike capabilities to counter the North's missile and nuclear threat. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

S. Korea Mobilizes Maritime Squads; Reacts to North's Missile Launches
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.