Turning Point for Credit Cards

By Streeter, William W. | ABA Banking Journal, June 2009 | Go to article overview

Turning Point for Credit Cards


Streeter, William W., ABA Banking Journal


THE INDUSTRY JUST GOT A second slap in the face over credit cards--this one from Congress. The new legislation imposes all sorts of restrictions regarding pricing, rates, and practices, much of it already covered by the rules issued by the Federal Reserve late last year. It looks like Congress and the Administration wanted to get credit for helping consumers on an issue that has been fanned to red hot by media attention and consumer activists.

As a result, credit cards may be less desirable to issuers and may not be nearly so available to consumers as they have been.

We have little sympathy, however, for the card issuers whose practices brought on this rebuke. As we've stated here before, people have, or should have, a responsibility for how they use a financial product--as in paying on time, not spending more than they can afford, etc. And issuers have to cover the risks inherent in extending unsecured credit. But things went off the reservation in cardland, and now we have the payback.

The point here isn't to wag a finger at anyone, especially after the fact. Rather, it's to point out that there is an opportunity in this setback to rethink what people want and need, and to provide new services profitably. Credit cards, we're sure, won't disappear, but there may be real opportunities in alternatives to the traditional credit card, and, more broadly, from the ongoing shift in the mindset of consumers toward credit in general. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Turning Point for Credit Cards
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.