Simryn Gill: TRACY WILLIAMS, LTD

By Scrimgeour, Alexander | Artforum International, Summer 2009 | Go to article overview

Simryn Gill: TRACY WILLIAMS, LTD


Scrimgeour, Alexander, Artforum International


The sculptures and photographs in Sydney-based Malaysian artist Simryn Gill's recent exhibition, like her project "Standing still," 2000-2003, a series of photographs documenting derelict properties throughout Southeast Asia, and Garland, 2006, a selection of waterworn objects found during beachcombing excursions, occupied the shifting and indistinct boundary between abandonment and reclamation.

As is characteristic of Gill's practice, the works in the show were marked by a visual modesty that belies the ramifications of the stories of their genesis. In Mine, 2007-2009--a collection of spherical objects either found or constructed from bits and bobs picked up near Gill's studios in Sydney and Port Dickson, Malaysia--the convergence of the personal, the poetic, and the historiographic that makes up her art emerges most strongly through the list of materials, worth quoting in its entirety for the light it sheds on her sensibility: "paper bark, banana skins, copper wires salvaged from a burnt-out printing press and other discarded bits of electrical wire, hair bands and shoelaces found on the street, various termite soils, river clay, aerial roots from ficus trees, tropical vines, rubber casing from looted copper wires, stalks from gourd plants, scraps of paper, mangosteen skins, bark from date palms pulled off by nesting ibises, yams, cardboard boxes, cow pats, pomegranates from a friend's fruit bowl, a brick tumbled into roundness by the sea, ivy, a rock, a ball of string, rubber-bands, and palm leaves." Looking at Mine with this list in mind, one recognizes that much more is in play here than a simple craftlike notion of artmaking by which detritus is refashioned into quietly beautiful constellations of objects. The work is, rather, an artistic intervention embedded within historical, economic, social, and environmental narratives. It unfolds within a conceptual framework that--as the punning title suggests--posits the relationship between the personal and the material world as what enables both the excavation of meaning and the creation of art. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Simryn Gill: TRACY WILLIAMS, LTD
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.