Audio Books

By Hardyment, Cristina | New Statesman (1996), December 5, 1997 | Go to article overview

Audio Books


Hardyment, Cristina, New Statesman (1996)


Christina Hardyment offers sound advice for those who want to listen

There can be few easier ways of Christmas shopping than going to the spoken word department of your local book or record shop. Their novelty is still high: who'd have thought you'd find Helena Bonham Carter reading the unexpurgated edition of Anne Frank's Diary of a Young Girl (Penguin, unabridged, [pounds]20.99), or Sir John Gielgud reciting with high seriousness the courtship of the Yonghy-Bonghy-Bo (Edward Lear's Book of Nonsense (HH495, [pounds]5.99)?

Titles can be found to suit everyone from querulous great aunts to brawling toddlers. Prices range from [pounds]5 to [pounds]50, and they're featherlight to post. Seriously lazy givers can phone the Talking Book-shop (0171-491 4117), which will advise, giftwrap and post for you.

Deft compliments can be paid, subtle insults dealt. Give Edward Gibbon's The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire (NA612214, [pounds]16.99) to your Europhobe and Europhile friends; each will draw their own conclusions from Philip Madoc's authoritative delivery.

Romantics can swoon to the haunting rhythms of Sir Thomas Malory's The Death of Arthur (NA300114, [pounds]8.99), or get caught up in Maureen O'Brien's intensely moving reading of Jane Eyre (CTC449, unabridged, [pounds]44.99). Smart reading in the younger follow-your-heart set is Paulo Coelho's The Alchemist (THC008, [pounds]11.99), a fable of an Andalusian shepherd boy's journey to Tangier and the desert in search of destiny and true love.

Poetry is given huge added value when poets read their verse. UA Fanthorpe's Double Act (Penguin, [pounds]8.99), is just that: she shares the reading of her wry, perceptive and benevolent poetry with her friend Rose Bailey. Ted Hughes reads his own and others' verse magnificently, dealing equally well with Hopkins' sprung rhythm, Emily Dickinson's wry delicacies and the rolling torrents of Tennyson in his anthology By Heart: 101 Poems to Remember (Faber/Penguin, 3 hours, [pounds]8.99).

Christmas has to be the time to give some lucky someone Penguin Classics' magnificent 12-cassette set of Penguin English Verse (Penguin, [pounds]50), which ranges from Thomas Wyatt ("They flee me now that sometime did me seek") to Wilfred Owen ("a maid, laughing the love-laugh with me, proud of looks"), read by as rich a variety of actors and actresses.

The abridged version of Louis Berniere's Captain Corelli's Mandolin (BBC, [pounds]8.99) has been acclaimed, but I think writing of such magical resonance should be heard complete. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Audio Books
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.