Artists' Residencies

By Lydiate, Henry | Art Monthly, July-August 2009 | Go to article overview

Artists' Residencies


Lydiate, Henry, Art Monthly


At this time of global economic downturn, when governments across the world and especially in developed economies are committing vast sums of public money to prevent unemployment, some money is being earmarked to support artistic endeavour. This piece explores whether there is, or could be, a standard or model approach for engaging artists-in-residence.

Artists' residencies are not unique to the modern era. They were practised long before the development of the art market in recent centuries and the establishment of today's global trade in artworks as portable commodities with financial value. During the artistic Renaissance in the western world, for example, artists' incomes were derived chiefly from the execution of subject- and site-specific commissions dictated by high-networth patrons. Some such commissions involved a freelance contract between artist and patron, others involved a contract of employment: either way, artists worked at the patron's specified location and often took up residence there.

In the 17th and 18th centuries, such commissions were substantially reduced, and artists in the main became authors of self-generated works for sale. The turn of the 19th and 20th centuries saw the emergence of artists' residential colonies at, for example, Worpswede near Bremen in Germany (1889), the Woodstock area of New York State (1903) and Dartington in England (1925).

In 1935 the US government established the Federal Art Project (FAP), which was the visual element of the second of President Franklin D Roosevelt's New Deals aimed at tackling unemployment in the Depression era. Operating until 1943, FAP employed artists and paid them a basic wage to produce artworks (around 200,000 in all) for public institutions such as schools, libraries and hospitals, notably including Lee Krasner, Jackson Pollock, Mark Rothko and Willem de Kooning. The 1960s and 70s saw the development of further residency schemes: artists were engaged to work in public institutions (such as schools, hospitals, prisons, places of religious worship, universities, galleries and museums), though not always residentially, to produce artworks stimulated by or related to the institution.

Following economic globalisation and the facilitation of international travel and communications in recent times, a wide range of international artist-in-residence programmes have developed: some merely offer living and/or working space; others involve commissioning sitespecific works and/or subject matter. The long-standing and prestigious DAAD Artist-in-Berlin fellowships are the forerunners to all artists' residencies. However, as an example of a newly set-up residency programme, the UKbased online support service for artists, Artquest, has recently invited applications for a threemonth residency in Berlin offering a free live/work studio for 3 months, return air fare, a 600 [pounds sterling] bursary and 100 [pounds sterling] towards artists materials'. The artist is required to produce: 'three articles about their experiences for Artquest to disseminate on our website. This could include updates on work produced, galleries visited, or a general overview of life in Berlin.'

There are no national or international standard or model approaches to artists' residencies. Increasingly frequently, they are offered to authors and performers across all arts disciplines; though many continue to be art form-specific. Some require residence at a specific place or space for a defined period of time, which can range from a week or so to a year or two; others require attendance, not residence. The nature and extent of accommodation and facilities also vary, and may require rent to be paid by the artist or (more usually) are rent free. Artists may be paid a salary or wage as an employee, or be paid an overall project/residency fee as a freelance/sole trader. Artists are usually required to produce a work or body of works, to be exhibited on an ongoing basis throughout the residency or (more usually) as an exposition towards the end of the project; and they may be required to donate and/or sell work to the host organisation, and to teach/coach or give talks about their work. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Artists' Residencies
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.