Sales Plummet as Birth Dearth Arrives

USA TODAY, March 1998 | Go to article overview

Sales Plummet as Birth Dearth Arrives


According to a demographic study commissioned by KGA Advertising, Middletown, Conn., businesses that continue to view the 18-34-year-old market as a lifeblood to their success either are currently on life-support systems or already have succumbed to this misapprehension. The marketplace has lost thousands of once powerful industry leaders nationwide to this type of thinking. The motorcycle industry demonstrates the most dramatic example of a business that was wiped out because of its precipitous fall in sales. Over-all unit sales plummeted from 1,200,000 in the mid 1980s to 400,000 over the next five years.

KGA Advertising, which had the North Eastern American Honda Motorcycle account at the time, sought to discover why an entire product category was wasting away. According to Ken Gronbach, KGA president and CEO, "it's the birth dearth -- a cyclical population phenomenon that historically has impacted our economy, but that has not been widely recognized or understood before now, and as a result has taken marketers by complete surprise."

The enormous group of "baby busters," people born between 1966 and 1976, has moved into the coveted 18-34 age group that the baby boomers, a market of some 76,000,000 individuals, have exited. The baby buster generation that resulted from the birth dearth in the 1970s is 50% smaller in size. As the first boomers turned 50 in 1996, this massive trend-setting market with its unprecedented buying power that has commanded the marketplace for the last 30 years began its metamorphosis from the youth market into the mid-life market. The boomers leave a huge void in the marketplace that, by virtue of sheer size, is impossible for the birth dearth generation to fill. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • A full archive of books and articles related to this one
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Sales Plummet as Birth Dearth Arrives
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.