The Sixth International Workshop on Nonmonotonic Reasoning

By Goldszmidt, Moises; Lifschitz, Vladimir | AI Magazine, Fall 1997 | Go to article overview

The Sixth International Workshop on Nonmonotonic Reasoning


Goldszmidt, Moises, Lifschitz, Vladimir, AI Magazine


The Sixth International Workshop on Nonmonotonic Reasoning, sponsored by the American Association for Artificial Intelligence (AAAI), was held 10 to 12 June 1996 in Timberline, Oregon. The aim of the workshop was to bring together active researchers interested in nonmonotonic reasoning to discuss current research, results, and problems of both a theoretical and a practical nature. The authors of the technical papers accepted for the workshop represented 10 countries: Austria, Brazil, Canada, France, Germany, Israel, Italy, the Netherlands, the United States, and Venezuela. The papers described new work on default logic; circumscription; modal nonmonotonic logics; logic programming; abduction; the frame problem; and other subjects, including qualitative probabilities.

A special report presented at the meeting reviewed the miniworkshop on causality held in Austin, Texas, in May 1996. In addition, the program included three panels entitled (1) "Do Computers Need Common Sense?"; (2) "Implementations of Nonmonotonic Reasoning Systems"; and (3) "The Future of Nonmonotonic Reasoning as a Subfield of AI."

The panel discussions turned into lively debates. What are the goals of research on nonmonotonic reasoning - are they primarily computational (the development of more efficient algorithms) or conceptual (the formalization of human reasoning)? How do we evaluate its progress - should we measure it in terms of its own problems and milestones, or is it essential that our work have an impact on other subfields of AI, perhaps more applied? …

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