An Intelligent System for Case Review and Risk Assessment in Social Services

By Nolan, James R. | AI Magazine, Spring 1998 | Go to article overview

An Intelligent System for Case Review and Risk Assessment in Social Services


Nolan, James R., AI Magazine


Case review and assessment of client need is an important task in many social service areas. The services and benefits that clients receive are based largely on such reviews and assessments. The failure to perform accurate reviews and assessments in a timely manner can result in a client being denied access to services when they most need them.

The typical scenario with regard to case review and assessment in social services situations involves a professional caseworker reviewing a client's file, conducting a phone or in-person interview if necessary, and making an assessment using the information obtained from the review and heuristics developed from experience. The caseworker is generally a professional who possesses expertise in the appropriate field. Some examples of fields where this expertise is found include medicine, mental health, and education.

As pointed out by Ferns (1995), social service organizations are faced with a variety of challenges, including increased need for services, decreased funding for service, and growing government regulation. Many social service organizations have developed large backlogs of cases waiting for review and assessment. These backlogs have reduced the time that caseworkers can spend on other services, such as counseling clients. These pressures have forced many social service organizations to investigate technologies suitable for relief of their burden (Lewis 1994; Murrelle et al. 1992). One such technology is intelligent systems. The possibility of the development of intelligent systems that would contain the domain knowledge and heuristics exhibited by the most effective professionals in the review and assessment process became attractive.

Social Security Disability Screening

The 1934 Social Security Act provides for financial assistance for individuals who have been declared disabled. In New York State, the task of disability determination for acceptance into either the Title XVI Supplemental Security Income (SSI) or Title II Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) program rolls rests with the New York State Department of Social Services Office of Disability Determination (ODD). In addition to its primary responsibility for disability determination, ODD refers any person whom they feel might benefit from vocational rehabilitation services to the New York State Department of Education Office of Vocational and Educational Services for Individuals with Disabilities (VESID).

The assessment of social security disability cases for referral to VESID has been accomplished through a cooperative program between ODD and VESID. The program consists of VESID professionals stationed at the ODD performing case assessments and referring appropriate social security-accepted cases directly to the VESID district offices.

The 1981 amendments the Social Security Act changed the method by which the Social Security Administration (SSA) was authorized to pay for vocational rehabilitation services. Prior to the 1981 amendments, the SSA provided grants to cover the cost of vocational rehabilitation services for social security recipients. With enactment of the amendments, the SSA was authorized to pay for services only on a case-by-case basis and only in those instances where vocational rehabilitation services have resulted in the recipient performing at substantial gainful activity for a continuous period of nine months.

This change in reimbursement methods had an immediate and dramatic effect on the level of SSA funding available to New York VESID. SSA, under the grant system, used to provide approximately $5 million a year to New York VESID. Post-1981 amendments reduced the funding to approximately $1 million a year. The amendments forced New York VESID to reexamine its level of participation in the social security vocational rehabilitation assessment process with ODD. The effect of this reexamination was a sharp cutback in the number of VESID employees dedicated to the assessment effort. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

An Intelligent System for Case Review and Risk Assessment in Social Services
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.