RNC Reconsiders Primary Schedule; Health Care, Cap-and-Trade Plans Opposed

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), August 2, 2009 | Go to article overview

RNC Reconsiders Primary Schedule; Health Care, Cap-and-Trade Plans Opposed


Byline: Ralph Z. Hallow, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

SAN DIEGO -- Before wrapping up the four-day annual summer meeting of the Republican National Committee, members debated changing the 2012 GOP presidential primary schedule - something for the first time in their history they can actually do on their own, without approval of the more than 2,000 delegates who attend the quadrennial Republican National Convention.

Any change we make will have to be approved by two-thirds of the RNC members, so there will have to be a solid consensus that satisfies big and small states, said former Michigan GOP Chairman Saul Anuzis, who is a member of the ad hoc delegate selection committee that will continue hashing over ways to head off the perceived slide toward a one-day national primary that would, in theory, benefit candidates with more money and greater name recognition.

Last year, members at the Republican National Convention in St. Paul, Minn., voted to give the RNC power over the schedule.

A final proposal for the primary schedule is expected to be presented for approval at the annual winter RNC meeting of its 168 members in January in Washington.

The state party chairmen and elected national committeemen and women from 50 states and six U.S. territories who assembled in San Diego were successful in making some national GOP policy, enacting resolutions condemning President Obama's health care reform goals as further marching toward socialism.

RNC members also put their party on record as opposing the Obama-backed cap on greenhouse-gas emissions and the proposed trading of emission allotments as a tax that greatly exceeds any benefits.

Other resolutions enacted include one that requires their national chairman, Michael S. …

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