Selections from the 2008 Moment Magazine Presidential Poll

Moment, September-October 2008 | Go to article overview

Selections from the 2008 Moment Magazine Presidential Poll


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JOHN MCCAIN

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Senator John McCain received 27.3 percent of the vote in the 2008 Moment Magazine Presidential Poll.

I am not devoted to either candidate. However, I do not understand smart Jews voting for Barack Obama, who is an empty suit. John McCain sometimes looks like an old man. But I am a one-issue voter. I would like to preserve the Supreme Court and want future federal judges to be conservative and not activist. I fear the appointees of Obama, but McCain has said he will only appoint conservative judges.

Grace D.

Las Vegas, NV

Republican

In my lifetime, I've always concluded that if my favorite didn't win, the other guy wouldn't be terrible. Until now. I am truly fearful of Barack Obama. Israel's security is in serious jeopardy if he becomes president. When he addresses AIPAC, he is our best buddy. Then the next day, he's buddies with the Muslim followers. His entire campaign is a sham. And the worst part is that the Jews in this country are so diehard Democrat that they want to believe him. This guy scares the hell out of me. And don't even get me started on what will happen to my taxes.

Alan Bomstein

Clearwater, FL

Independent

The American president isn't American Idol. Voting for a president because he is the most popular rather than most qualified is dangerous and just plain stupid. Barack Obama has no credible experience, and this is a very dangerous time. My son is in Iraq and I certainly do not want a president who wants to talk to the enemy. I have always loved my country even when Americans made questionable choices, like electing George W. Bush. I feel Obama will be the biggest of all mistakes we will make and not because he is black, but because contrary to what he says, his record indicates he hates this country and the white population.

Catherine Malachowsky

St. Petersburg, FL

Republican

I could never consider voting for Barack Obama because his whole Senate term in office amounts to around 146 days and in that time he got little to nothing done. I also do not trust his support for and commitment to Israel. One day he's gung-ho pro-Israel, the next day after the Palestinians and Hamas make noise, he's back-pedaling, saying he didn't quite know what was meant by "undivided" Jerusalem. Perhaps if Obama were a true Christian, I'd have less problem voting for him, but when you are a "Wright" Black Liberation theology Christian for 20 years, you are not exactly a Christian as far as I'm concerned. And with all the Muslim input he's had in his life, he's got to be pretty mixed up. He recently was quoted as saying America is no longer just a Christian country because it is such a melting pot of religions. He's way off base on that statement as he is on so many issues that concern me, such as lowering taxes and government spending, fixing our school system, improving our health care system but not socializing it, etc. I may not agree with many things John McCain believes in, but he's a lot closer to my Jewish conservative principles than Obama.

Shirley Cohen

San Francisco, CA

Independent

Barack Obama is extremely left wing, and he will be bad for the U.S. in the war, bad for the economy. John McCain is a much better friend of Israel. We can't afford a radical rookie at this point in our nation's history.

Mark Cohen

Huntington Beach, CA

Republican

I don't see how anyone who has family in Israel or loves Israel can vote for Barack Obama. There is nothing in Obama's history to indicate that he'll support Israel. Quite the contrary, he's expressed an interest in meeting with terrorists. I expect he'll want to pacify them. For 20 years he was an active member of a church that saw fit to honor Louis Farrakhan with a lifetime achievement award. …

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Selections from the 2008 Moment Magazine Presidential Poll
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