At Catholic Colleges, a Shift to Lay Leadership

By Whitley, Brian | National Catholic Reporter, July 24, 2009 | Go to article overview

At Catholic Colleges, a Shift to Lay Leadership


Whitley, Brian, National Catholic Reporter


CALDWELL, N.J. * When Sr. Patrice Werner retired in June after 15 years as president of Caldwell College, the school founded by the Sisters of St. Dominic 70 years ago witnessed the end of an era--in more ways than one.

A layperson--Nancy Blattner--took over as head of the 2,300-student college.

"We're handing over a position," said Werner, who was the school's eighth president, all Dominican nuns, "but we're not handing over the college."

While the shift may be new to Caldwell, it's increasingly familiar on America's Catholic campuses. For decades, the number of nuns nationwide has steadily and dramatically thinned. As a result, it has become increasingly rare for a nun to lead a Catholic college.

Of the 18 Dominican colleges and universities in the United States, Werner said, her retirement will leave just three with presidents from the religious order.

Fewer than half of the roughly 250 Catholic institutions nationwide are headed by nuns or priests, according to the Association of Catholic Colleges and Universities, compared with 70 percent in 1993, the year before Werner became president at Caldwell.

At Caldwell, the changing of the guard has sparked a renewed focus on emphasizing the values and history of the Dominican order.

Several years ago, the college named one of its youngest nuns, 40-something Sr. Kathleen Tuite, to a high-level position with the goal of promoting the school's distinct religious identity.

Looking to ensure that everyone on campus understands the "four pillars" of Dominican life, including prayer and community, Tuite prepares information on traditions and hosts special lectures on topics such as Catholic identity.

She also heads an educational program that annually sends 35 campus representatives to meet those of other Dominican colleges in Fanjeaux, the town in southern France where St. Dominic sowed the seeds of his education-centered philosophy more than 800 years ago.

Blattner, who served as vice president and dean of academic affairs at Fontbonne University in St. Louis, was selected after a search that revealed just how much attitudes about governance at Catholic institutions have changed. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

At Catholic Colleges, a Shift to Lay Leadership
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.