Saddam's Stone Wall: Iraq Still Hasn't Satisfied the U.N. Inspectors

By Beals, Gregory; Barry, John | Newsweek, April 27, 1998 | Go to article overview

Saddam's Stone Wall: Iraq Still Hasn't Satisfied the U.N. Inspectors


Beals, Gregory, Barry, John, Newsweek


When United Nations arms inspectors arrived at the Radwaniyah presidential compound in Baghdad earlier this month, smiling Iraqi officials met them, offering tea. The smiles didn't last; the Iraqis were furious when the inspectors said they wanted to take aerial photographs of the complex. The argument became so heated that Secretary-General Kofi Annan had to intervene via telephone to get approval for the pictures. Despite the departure from their script, the Iraqis got the outcome they wanted. As the experts continued their inspection of Radwaniyah, they found what they had expected to find: nothing-no trace of Iraqi efforts to build weapons of mass destruction. But that's not the end of it.

Saddam Hussein thought perfunctory visits to his presidential palaces would be a prelude to the end of the inspections. Instead, a new U.N. assessment, released last week, said the Iraqis are still lying about their weapons program. In his semiannual report to the Security Council, chief investigator Richard Butler said Baghdad had made "virtually no progress in verifying disarmament." In fact, the inspectors found evidence that Iraq may still have the capability to produce chemical and biological weapons. "The Iraqis are behaving nicely," says a senior U.N. official, "but they haven't changed their policy."

That could set off a dispute when the Security Council meets next week to discuss the report and argue about lifting the economic sanctions imposed on Iraq. Last fall, Butler quietly made a major concession to Saddam: Iraq and the inspectors would each make their case to international panels of experts in "Technical Evaluation Meetings"--TEMs in U.N. jargon. This would offset the strong American and British presence on the inspection teams by subjecting them to review by Russian, French and other experts potentially friendlier to Iraq. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Saddam's Stone Wall: Iraq Still Hasn't Satisfied the U.N. Inspectors
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.