Sharp Investments; Collecting Weapons with an Edge

Daily Examiner (Grafton, Australia), August 8, 2009 | Go to article overview

Sharp Investments; Collecting Weapons with an Edge


Collecting edged weapons is a fascinating pastime and there are so many different specimens around with interesting backgrounds that can take a lot of time, effort and patience to adequately research. Some edged weapons were made for purposes that faded from use so long ago that they present a real puzzle to modern collectors. Edged weapons usually have distinguishing marks indicating their manufacturer, whether they were of military issue and sometimes the crest, family name or the name of an individual owner.

Weapons of the greatest antiquity are made from stone, bone and wood. Australian Aborigines have produced some very fine knives made from stone and obsidian which can be thousands of years old. Metal-edged weapons may one day become outdated but they seem certain to remain favoured in traditional usage for many years ahead.

Samurai swords were typically custom made to extremely high standards of workmanship for Japan's feudal period Samurai warrior caste. This existed from the 11th to the late 19th centuries and is associated with a most sophisticated sword culture. Thousands of military issue Samurai swords were surrendered to Allied forces by the defeated Japanese military at the end of World War Two. Many of these swords found their way to Australia and are worth anywhere between several hundreds of dollars to thousands depending on the standard of workmanship and physical condition. …

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Sharp Investments; Collecting Weapons with an Edge
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