Going Underground; Mind the Chat; Turner Prize Winner Jeremy Deller Perks Up the Piccadilly Line

The Evening Standard (London, England), August 14, 2009 | Go to article overview

Going Underground; Mind the Chat; Turner Prize Winner Jeremy Deller Perks Up the Piccadilly Line


Byline: Jeremy Deller

When I was 11 and at Dulwich College, my art teacher told me I wasn't very good at art. I couldn't draw, paint or sculpt (I still can't), but nonetheless I decided that my lack of skill shouldn't stop me from being an artist. So, after I'd finished school, I spun my parents a line about becoming a teacher and went to New York to do work experience at The Factory. It was 1986 and I wandered around wide-eyed while Andy Warhol ran a magazine, made films and took pictures. I learned that the kind of things I'm interested in are people, history and collaborations, and got to work without a canvas or paintbrushes.

My creations have been varied. In 2000 I got the WI flower-arranging in the Tate and the next year I recreated the Battle of Orgreave, a 1984 clash between miners and police, with a historical re-enactment group. I won the Turner Prize in 2004 for Memory Bucket, a documentary about George W Bush's Texan hometown, and earlier this year I towed a blown-up car around the States with an Iraqi civilian and an American soldier. There's a playfulness to what I do.

When I came back home to London, Louis Vuitton commissioned a work to open its new store in Westfield. I set up an urban garden with flowers, vegetables and weeds, guarded by a scarecrow. It's all art that can't be contained, bought or sold; the things that money can't buy but are still worth a lot.

The idea to improve life on the Underground came to me 18 months ago. I was so tired of the pointless prerecorded announcements like 'Don't forget to use your Oyster card' blaring over the Tannoy at my local station, Highbury & Islington.

Standing on the platform I felt myself turning into a grumpy old man, wishing announcements were more personal and reflected the realities and absurdities of living and working in a big city. So I approached Art on the Underground (the people responsible for Poems on the Underground) and outlined an idea for drivers to read out literary quotations to loosen up their journey. After all, the proliferation of these banal statements is not their fault. I mean, on buses now they tell you what number bus you're sitting on. It's insane.

I had been inspired by a funny occasion when a Tube driver had unexpectedly told off a passenger for standing too close to the approaching train. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Going Underground; Mind the Chat; Turner Prize Winner Jeremy Deller Perks Up the Piccadilly Line
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.