'Cancer Villages' in Rural China Heavily Polluted

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), August 16, 2009 | Go to article overview

'Cancer Villages' in Rural China Heavily Polluted


Byline: Michael Standaert, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

XIADIAN, China -- Located just downstream from three steel factories, a paper mill and a bone-processing plant, the citizens of Xiadian have grown used to seeing the Baoqiu River turn red, yellow and sometimes white from what they say is untreated industrial wastewater.

The town also has seen at least 50 of its 3,000 residents die of cancer in the past five years; an unknown number of others are being treated for cancer or other pollution-related diseases.

People get cancer and die; there's not much to do about it. There's not much to hope for, said Mrs. Zuo, a 24-year-old restaurant worker who asked that she be identified by only her last name.

Although she's been married for almost a year, Mrs. Zuo said she does not want to have children - at least until she can save enough money to move away from the town about 40 miles southeast of Beijing. Many people want to move out of the village, but they don't have the money to, she said.

Xiadian is one of dozens of places in China that local media have dubbed cancer villages. Cancers of the liver, stomach and lung and leukemia are all showing up in these villages at rates environmental activists say are above average.

The situation brings into sharp focus the problems of rural communities where environmental protection is less stringent than in major cities such as Beijing.

After years of heavy pollution, the big cities are increasingly pushing their heavy industry to rural areas and away from their more middle-class and environmentally conscious residents.

In Xiadian, Ms. Sun, a shopkeeper who provided only one name, said she knows at least five people who have died of cancer in the past few years, as well as an 18-year-old boy who is battling leukemia.

Yes, I'm worried about my health, said Ms. Sun, 61. We only realized there was a problem in the past three or four years. People began dying; they would die only a few months after getting cancer and couldn't be cured.

Ms. Sun said the locals stopped drinking the well water about a year ago, and they no longer use the water for their animals or crops. Drinking water is now pumped in from the neighboring county of Dacheng, and the villagers are given free health checkups once a year.

One man said that being diagnosed with cancer is a source of shame, so patients and their families choose not to talk about it. A lot of the young people already have left the village, he said, leaving the poorer and older villagers behind.

At the local medical clinic, the one doctor on duty refused to speak about the pollution problems or cancer rates, saying he had only recently come back to the village.

Acknowledging the problems, China's Ministry of Environmental Protection said last month that it would release $134 million from a special fund to help build wastewater and sewage treatment facilities and ensure safe drinking water in villages throughout the country. …

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