Planning for a Disaster - It Could Save Your Business If Your Computers Fail; ADVERTISING FEATURE

Western Mail (Cardiff, Wales), August 26, 2009 | Go to article overview

Planning for a Disaster - It Could Save Your Business If Your Computers Fail; ADVERTISING FEATURE


COMPUTER failure may stop your business in its tracks - with help from M7 you could safeguard your systems for as little as pounds 250 a month.

Companies which have lost data are increasingly finding that recovery from outdated tape backup systems is ineffective.

This may be because the data back-up simply hasn't worked, has never been tested or is capable of restoring the data but when a disaster occurs the company has no applications or systems to run it on.

Business requirements following a catastrophic event differ widely but the need to plan for such an event is now a business imperative.

It is not just flood or fire that can stop a business, in fact it is far more likely that computer or network failure will halt production, delay services, prevent orders and invoices being processed and damage your company's reputation.

If the failure involves significant data loss then the impact can threaten the survival of the business.

Research has shown that up to 40% of businesses that experience a catastrophic data loss cease trading within 12 months.

Many businesses can run for 24 hours or more without all their IT systems being available. These businesses may have critical users who need access to e-mail and finance applications quickly but don't need full duplication of all their systems.

The first consideration for management is what costs or losses the business incurs for each minute, hour or day while IT systems are unavailable? Knowing this enables you to decide what your recovery time objective for applications and users should be.

In automotive supply chains, for example, stopping a production line of a customer may incur charges by the minute, making business continuity a priority.

Insurance cover in this instance is not enough, systems need to be recovered in real time with data, processes and infrastructure all mirrored.

Knowing the time within which you need to have key systems back and running enables you to further understand the point at which you need to recover to. …

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