Philosophical Gap on Health Care

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), September 9, 2009 | Go to article overview

Philosophical Gap on Health Care


Byline: Armstrong Williams, SPECIAL TO THE WASHINGTON TIMES

As Congress returns from its August recess, the political debate on health care reform revolves around four basic issues. First, how should the government provide health care for uninsured Americans? Second, how can reform reduce overall medical costs and improve health care? Third, who should pay for reform? Fourth, should there be a single-payer government health care option?

The analysis by politicians and pundits will continue to focus on the costs and benefits of the present health care system versus various reform proposals. Unfortunately, this cost-benefit analysis obfuscates the underlying philosophical debate on health care between conservative Republicans and liberal Democrats.

The real debate is whether the individual and his or her doctor should be responsible for health care or whether the government should be responsible.

Republican supporters of the current private health care system (which includes a heavy dose of government involvement) have good evidence that it does a good job providing health care services to most Americans. Approximately 85 percent of Americans are covered by the system and 80 percent of Americans are satisfied with their health care coverage. Many of the individuals who are not covered by a health care program are either illegal immigrants or individuals who decide for their own rational reasons not to purchase insurance.

Republicans recognize that the current system is expensive compared with Western European socialized medical systems. Much of the additional cost is due to aggressive judicial interference by tort lawyers, government regulation, unhealthy lifestyles, research and development of new medical technology, and consumer choice (i.e. the lack of rationing by the government). Republicans may support the need for improvement of the current health care system but not wholesale dismantling.

Democratic proponents of reform see the current private health care system as one that fails to provide adequate health care to many American residents. Approximately 15 percent of Americans are not covered and 20 percent of Americans are not happy with their current medical coverage. Liberal Democrats think that private insurance companies and pharmaceutical companies are a major cause of America's high cost medical system because they provide health care products and services at a profit. It is irrelevant that profits drive advances in medical technology.

Liberal Democrats also think that the government has a responsibility to provide universal health care for all Americans. Universal health care should be paid for through higher taxes and health care mandates on employers and medical service providers. In their view, medical care is not a commodity to be allocated by market forces like other essential commodities such as food, shelter, clothing and energy. Hence, for liberal Democrats, health care nirvana would be a single-payer, government-run health care system.

These seemingly irreconcilable positions are a result of the underlying conflicting political philosophies held by conservatives and liberals.

Conservatives think that the individual is generally responsible for his or her own situation in life. They have faith in the individual to make rational decisions regarding important issues. They also think that the individual in the private market is better able to allocate economic resources than government bureaucrats. In addition, conservatives do not like radical change for a system that is not dysfunctional.

On the other hand, liberals believe in communal responsibility for the individual because the individual is constrained by his or her circumstances. They believe that the free market often provides an unfair result for certain critical commodities and services (in this case, health care for people of limited means or who make improvident decisions in life). …

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