Adwatch 09.09.09: Nestle Oats & More

Marketing, September 9, 2009 | Go to article overview

Adwatch 09.09.09: Nestle Oats & More


The brand has dropped the 'You won't like it' endline from its ads, but is it for the better?.

I didn't have time for a proper breakfast this morning, so apologies if I come across as a little cranky. But you know the feeling. You spend months talking to real people, you interrogate the product and you analyse the competition's every move.

Yet at the end of it all, somehow the conclusion that emerges is that the best thing about the brand, the big chance to rock people out of their habitual trudge down the cereal aisle, the killer promise that will transform the brand's future and which you've all sweated for is ... 'it's delicious'.

Inside, you let out a small, almost imperceptible sigh. It's not wrong. It's just not very right, either.

Everyone involved tries their best to set it apart from the rest of the market by injecting the brand's own particular angle on this. 'This isn't just delicious, it's 'so delicious you won't want to share it',' you tell yourselves. But it's no good. You're lost in the mire.

Maybe this doesn't matter. After all, sales of oat cereals have been growing rapidly for a few years now, fuelled initially by the porridge craze and subsequently by the nation's inability to accept the dramatic demands on their time that preparing it takes. Nestle's Oats & More is perfectly placed to capitalise on that, if only it can figure out what it offers.

Nestle's broader quest to deliver great nutrition across its entire cereals range (and beyond) is laudable, and should stand it in good stead for the future. …

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Adwatch 09.09.09: Nestle Oats & More
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