'CSI' and the Internet Alter Realities of Mass Murders; TRYING TO UNDERSTAND These Types of Slayings Require Specific Theories and Approaches to Investigate, Experts Say

By Conner, Deirdre | The Florida Times Union, September 7, 2009 | Go to article overview

'CSI' and the Internet Alter Realities of Mass Murders; TRYING TO UNDERSTAND These Types of Slayings Require Specific Theories and Approaches to Investigate, Experts Say


Conner, Deirdre, The Florida Times Union


Byline: DEIRDRE CONNER

A little more than a week after the New Hope slayings, details of one of the biggest family killings in U.S. history are scant. What is known: Guy Heinze, Jr., 22, was charged Friday in connection with the murders of his father, six other family members and a family friend in the trailer where they all lived. A ninth victim, a 3-year-old boy, remains hospitalized from the Aug. 29 attack.

The massacre unnerved residents of Glynn County, leaving many worried for their own safety.

There and around the country, people struggled to comprehend how anyone could attack and kill a family that included two children and two people with disabilities.

Mass murder is a relatively new field of academic study, but experts have made strides in learning about it.

The Times-Union spoke with three criminologists about the crime of mass murder: James Alan Fox, an expert in mass murder and professor at Northeastern University; Christine E. Rasche, professor emeritus in the Department of Criminology at the University of North Florida; and Thomas Blomberg, dean of the College of Criminology and Criminal Justice at Florida State University.

None of them has consulted on the New Hope case; all stressed that it's impossible to speculate on what happened before more information is released.

What is mass murder?

Unlike serial murders, where the killer has periods of rest between victims, and spree murders, where a person kills numerous people over a period of time with no rest, mass murders take place all in one event, Rasche said.

In the past, she said, mass murders have typically fallen into a few broader categories based on where they take place: school, workplace and domestic. The New Hope slayings are clearly domestic because they took place in the family's trailer.

Most people are accustomed to the typical pattern of familicide, where a member of the family - mostly the male leader, but sometimes a child or mother - takes out the whole family and sometimes kills him or herself.

Often such actions are taken as payback for perceived injustice, Fox said, where there is one key target but others are killed as a further way to get even with that person.

"In situations with children who commit family annihilation," Fox said, "one parent might be the target."

In other cases, a family is killed by an outsider, whether motivated by a robbery, a grudge, a drug deal gone bad or some other reason.

Whatever the motive, mass murders require specific theories and approaches to investigate.

"Mass murders are different," Fox said. "It's not murder multiplied by eight victims."

Does the New Hope killing fall into one of those patterns?

It's impossible to say. Police have not released enough information to make a determination. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

'CSI' and the Internet Alter Realities of Mass Murders; TRYING TO UNDERSTAND These Types of Slayings Require Specific Theories and Approaches to Investigate, Experts Say
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.