GOPAEs Message to Medicare Users a Health Care Con

Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), September 4, 2009 | Go to article overview

GOPAEs Message to Medicare Users a Health Care Con


When exactly did the Republicans start operating one of those marketing scams that target the elderly?

It was bad enough when Sarah Palin told a bald Facebook lie that there were "death panels" in the plans to reform health care. It was worse to see Iowa Sen. Charles Grassley flunk the "pants on fire" test as he seconded this myth. Republicans planted the fear that President Obama wants to "kill Granny." Now they want Granny to kill health care reform.

I understand the marketing. Seniors were the only age group that Obama lost in last yearAEs election. He was change they didnAEt believe in. Now polls suggest the folks covered by Medicare are the least likely to think health care reform will help them. In Gallup polls, almost 40 percent think it will worsen their care.

Then last week Republican Chairman Michael Steele began to sell a "SeniorsAE Health Care Bill of Rights" u a pitch that contained no rights but an awful lot of frights. He targeted folks like the white-haired South Carolina man who furiously insisted at a town-hall meeting: "Keep your government hands off my Medicare." (Memo to the fact-checkers: Public Policy Polling reports that 62 percent of Republicans also think that government should keep out of that government-run program!)

Steele promised to outlaw "any effort to ration health care based on age" and "prevent government from dictating the terms of end-of-life care." He also promised to "protect Medicare" u presumably from the plan to save $500 billion out of a projected growth in its spending. He did not mention that the proposals would also close the "doughnut hole" in drug coverage, provide subsidies to low-income seniors and give the Medicare trust fund five more years of life.

This is not just a robo-call to enlist senior citizens in making this ObamaAEs "Waterloo. …

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GOPAEs Message to Medicare Users a Health Care Con
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