Armed Services Committee Testimony

By Keating, Timothy J. | DISAM Journal, August 2009 | Go to article overview

Armed Services Committee Testimony


Keating, Timothy J., DISAM Journal


[The following are excerpts from a transcript of the Admiral's testimony before the House Armed Services Committee, 24 March 2009. The article is provided by the courtesy of the U.S. Pacific Command (USPACOM) web site: http://www.pacom.mil/web/site_pages/commander/ Statements%20&%20Testimony.shtml.]

Introduction

In November [2008], we [PACOM] published the U.S. Pacific Command Strategy. It underscores the fundamental importance of sustained and persistent cooperation and collaboration in times of peace to mitigate situations that could lead to conflict and crisis. While it emphasizes security cooperation and capacity building, it does not signal a departure from our primary responsibility to fight and win. Instead, it acknowledges the complexity of our security environment and the importance of pro actively employing forces to strengthen partnerships and support conditions that preclude the necessity for combat operations. It is a strategy in which we collectively seek with our allies, partners, and friends multilateral solutions, recognizing challenges are best met together. Ours is a strategy based on partnership, readiness, and presence.

It is hard to overstate the importance of our engagement in the Asia-Pacific both to our national interests and to the broader interests of all in the region. Having visited most of the 36 nations in our area of responsibility (AOR), I am convinced that our success depends on our ability to understand the complexities and intricacies of this dynamic region. Please consider the following:

* USPACOM AOR encompasses almost half the earth's surface.

* More than half the world's population lives in our region.

* The Asia-Pacific is home to 36 nations, 3.4 billion people, three thousand different languages, the world's six largest militaries, (1) and five nations allied with the U.S. through mutual defense treaties?

* The region includes the most populous nation, the largest democracy, the largest Muslim-majority nation, and the smallest republic in the world. (3)

* China, Japan, [and] South Korea are three of our top trading partners. About one-third of our total two-way goods trade (4) is with nations in the region.

* Collectively, the region contributes 20 percent of the world's gross domestic product (GDP), thanks to several of the largest economies in the world?

* The Asia-Pacific region is home to 10 of the 15 smallest economies and to several hundred million people who still live below the $1.25 a day poverty line.

Given such diversity, the challenges are many. While the region is characterized by a remarkable level of relative stability, the endurance of the secure and stable conditions that underpin prosperity in the region is not a foregone conclusion. While USPACOM cannot take full credit for this generally favorable environment, the positive contributions of U.S. Armed Forces cannot be disputed. Our strategy is designed to ensure USPACOM remains an engaged and trusted partner committed to preserving the security, stability, and freedom upon which enduring prosperity in the Asia-Pacific region depends.

USPACOM readiness and presence support extensive military and civil cooperation in the Asia-Pacific. In response to several significant natural disasters this past year, our military forces provided aid during a number of Humanitarian Assistance and Disaster Relief (HADR) operations. Coordinating with U.S. Government (USG) agencies, U.S. embassy teams, and other Asia Pacific nations, our forces provided support to Burma in the aftermath of Cyclone Nargis. In February and in May 2008, our men and women aided China after it was struck first by extreme winter storms and followed by an earthquake in the Sichuan province; and in the wake of Typhoon Fengshen, the USS [U.S. Ship] Ronald Reagan Strike Group delivered critical supplies to outlying areas of the Philippines. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Armed Services Committee Testimony
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.