Driver Found Guilty of Murdering His Former Boss Had History of Violence and Robbery in US; KIller Came to UK While on Parole for Bank Robbery

Western Mail (Cardiff, Wales), September 12, 2009 | Go to article overview

Driver Found Guilty of Murdering His Former Boss Had History of Violence and Robbery in US; KIller Came to UK While on Parole for Bank Robbery


Byline: Antony Stone

A DRIVER who tortured and murdered his former boss in a terrifying four hour ordeal had a history of robbery and violence in the United States, it emerged yesterday.

Russell Carter, 52, was yesterday found guilty of the murder of Kingsley Monk, 45, at Driverline 247 in New Inn, Pontypool, last Os ctober. He was also convicted of three counts of attempting to murder other staff members.

Newport Crown Court heard that Carter's brutal crime, in which he carried a gun and beat Mr Monk with a pipe, had similarities to a violent armed robbery he committed in California in 1985. Police in Britain were unaware of his past until they began investigating the murder of Mr Monk at the Driverline office as there is no agreement between the US and the UK to exchange such details.

In Newport yesterday, prosecutor Hywel Huges outlined the details of that case to a stunned court.

He said that as a 29-year-old man on September 3, 1985, Carter held up a bank in Bakersfield, California, wielding a toy gun and with a female accomplice.

"The defendant planned to tie up bank staff and used torn-up bed sheets to gag members of staff," he said.

"He purchased a toy gun which was used. The items were taken into the bank in a black attache case."

He said bank staff were overpowered and tied up and more than 8,000 dollars was stolen. Before leaving, his female accomplice injected two women staff with a potassium hydroxide solution.

Carter was on parole for the offence, for which he was sentenced to 20 years in prison, when he returned to the UK.

Judge Nicholas Cooke, Recorder of Cardiff sitting in Newport, frequently stopped Mr Hughes to give a fuller explanation to the jury.

During the trial the jury was given a graphic account of how lorry driver Carter murdered his boss Kingsley Monk by strangling him, probably with his own tie.

He also tied up three other men, Gethin Heal, Nathan Taylor and Robert Lewis, as they arrived at work.

All three men were doused in fuel as Carter demanded pounds 3,000 that he claimed he was owed by the company.

Mr Heal, 42, told how he heard his boss being killed.

He said: "Kingsley was screaming for us to help him - it sounded like was being pushed about, banged against a wall.

"I heard a muffled scream from Kingsley. The sounds were haunting, it was terrible, I've never heard anything like that before."

Carter later told police he repeatedly kicked and hit Mr Monk with a piece of pipe before murdering him.

Police believe it was always Carter's intention to kill his three other victims as well.

He took pains to wear surgical gloves at the office so as not to leave fingerprints but he made no attempt to hide his identity and set the building on fire before leaving. …

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