Are You a Globalization Junkie? Then Test Your Knowledge of Global Trends, Economics, and Politics with 8 Questions about How the World Works

Foreign Policy, September-October 2009 | Go to article overview

Are You a Globalization Junkie? Then Test Your Knowledge of Global Trends, Economics, and Politics with 8 Questions about How the World Works


After China; which country executed the most people last year?

a) Iran

b) Saudi Arabia

c) United States

Which country spends the most on its military, per person?

a) China

b) Israel

c) Singapore

What percentage of the world's languages are at risk of going extinct?

a) 10 percent

b) 26 percent

c) 42 percent

What percentage of Silicon Valley tech companies founded between 1995 and 2005 were started by immigrants?

a) 23 percent

b) 34 percent

c) 52 percent

Which country's citizens can travel to the most countries and territories without a visa?

a) Canada

b) Denmark

c) Vatican City

In how many languages is Google available?

a) 43

b) 87

c) 127

Which African country has the largest U.S. troop presence?

a) Egypt

b) Djibouti

c) Kenya

North Korea recently imprisoned two U.S. journalists. Which other country is holding a foreign journalist in custody?

a) United States

b) Saudi Arabia

c) Singapore

Answers to the FP Quiz

1) A, Iran. In 2008, China had at least 1,718 executions, followed by Iran with 346. According to Amnesty International, the real numbers might be even higher. Saudi Arabia was the No. 3 executioner, with 102 killed, generally by public beheading. The United States, whose methods include electrocution and lethal injection, was No. 4, with 37 executions.

2) B, Israel. Israel spent about $2,300 per person on its military in 2008, some $400 more per person than No. 2 United States, according to The Economist. Tiny Singapore was No. 4, spending about $1,650 per person. When it comes to total military expenditure, however, no country comes close to the United States, which spent $607 billion in 2008, or 41.5 percent of the world's total, according to the Stockholm International Peace Research Institute.

3) C, 42 percent. Of the world's approximately 6,000 languages, 2,498 are known to be at risk of dying out, according to UNESCO. This means that children are no longer learning these languages or are speaking them only in restricted settings, such as within the home. One of the latest languages to go extinct is the Alaskan language of Eyak, whose last known speaker died in 2008. …

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